Photos: A day on Bhasan Char, Bangladesh’s remote island for Rohingya

UPDATED ON JAN 04, 2021 11:26 AM IST
Rohingya refugees wait on naval ships in Chittagong to be transported to the Bhasan Char island in the Baay of Bengal on December 29. Bangladesh navy ships transported a second batch comprising 1,804 Rohingya refugees from crowded camps in Cox’s Bazar district to Bhashan Char island, 34 kilometers from the mainland, after a four-hour naval journey from the port city of Chittagong. (Mahmud Hossain Opu / AP)
An overview of the housing complex of Bhashan Char island. Bangladesh says it has spent more than $350 million of its own money to ready housing and other infrastructure to voluntarily move some 100,000 Rohingya to the island in an effort to ease overcrowding in camps near the Myanmar border, even though rights groups say many were being coerced or paid to move. The government denies the charges. (Rehman Asad / AFP)
Rohingya refugees seen at the housing complex on Bhashan Char island after they were relocated in Noakhali on December 30. International aid agencies and the UN have opposed the relocation since it was first proposed in 2015, expressing fear that a big storm could wash over the island and endanger thousands of lives. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)
A Rohingya refugee is pictured in a room of the housing complex on December 30. The government said earlier this month that the housing was built on concrete foundation which could withstand natural disasters, noting it withstood cyclone Amphan in May which killed more than 100 people in Bangladesh and eastern India. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)
Rohingya refugees are seen next to eatery stalls at the Bhashan Char hosing complex in Noakhali on December 30. About 700,000 Rohingya Muslims fled from Buddhist-majority Myanmar to Bangladesh after August 2017, when Myanmar’s military began a harsh crackdown on the minority group following an attack by insurgents. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)
A general view of the housing complex on Bhashan Char island on December 30. Journalists on a guided tour of the facility last week shown around housing with two steel-and-plastic bunk beds for four people, a community kitchen with multiple stoves separated by small concrete partitions and a fresh-water pond, Reuters reported. A big white bungalow enclosed with a fence is reserved for VVIPs in case anyone fancies a visit. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)
Rohingya refugees seen outside accommodations at Bhashan Char island after they were relocated on December 30. Reuters was not allowed to meet with a previous group of some 1,600 Rohingya that was relocated early in December, but journalists were driven through the cemented lanes separating neat rows of grey-walled housing blocks with wide porches. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)
Rohingya refugees stand next to stalls selling vegetables at the housing complex on Bhashan Char island. Bangladesh has attempted to start sending refugees back to Myanmar under a bilateral agreement, but no one was willing to go, AP reported. The Rohingya are not recognized as citizens in Myanmar, rendering them stateless. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)

Rohingya refugees wait on naval ships in Chittagong to be transported to the Bhasan Char island in the Baay of Bengal on December 29. Bangladesh navy ships transported a second batch comprising 1,804 Rohingya refugees from crowded camps in Cox’s Bazar district to Bhashan Char island, 34 kilometers from the mainland, after a four-hour naval journey from the port city of Chittagong. (Mahmud Hossain Opu / AP)

An overview of the housing complex of Bhashan Char island. Bangladesh says it has spent more than $350 million of its own money to ready housing and other infrastructure to voluntarily move some 100,000 Rohingya to the island in an effort to ease overcrowding in camps near the Myanmar border, even though rights groups say many were being coerced or paid to move. The government denies the charges. (Rehman Asad / AFP)

Rohingya refugees seen at the housing complex on Bhashan Char island after they were relocated in Noakhali on December 30. International aid agencies and the UN have opposed the relocation since it was first proposed in 2015, expressing fear that a big storm could wash over the island and endanger thousands of lives. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)

A Rohingya refugee is pictured in a room of the housing complex on December 30. The government said earlier this month that the housing was built on concrete foundation which could withstand natural disasters, noting it withstood cyclone Amphan in May which killed more than 100 people in Bangladesh and eastern India. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)

Rohingya refugees are seen next to eatery stalls at the Bhashan Char hosing complex in Noakhali on December 30. About 700,000 Rohingya Muslims fled from Buddhist-majority Myanmar to Bangladesh after August 2017, when Myanmar’s military began a harsh crackdown on the minority group following an attack by insurgents. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)

A general view of the housing complex on Bhashan Char island on December 30. Journalists on a guided tour of the facility last week shown around housing with two steel-and-plastic bunk beds for four people, a community kitchen with multiple stoves separated by small concrete partitions and a fresh-water pond, Reuters reported. A big white bungalow enclosed with a fence is reserved for VVIPs in case anyone fancies a visit. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)

Rohingya refugees seen outside accommodations at Bhashan Char island after they were relocated on December 30. Reuters was not allowed to meet with a previous group of some 1,600 Rohingya that was relocated early in December, but journalists were driven through the cemented lanes separating neat rows of grey-walled housing blocks with wide porches. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)

Rohingya refugees stand next to stalls selling vegetables at the housing complex on Bhashan Char island. Bangladesh has attempted to start sending refugees back to Myanmar under a bilateral agreement, but no one was willing to go, AP reported. The Rohingya are not recognized as citizens in Myanmar, rendering them stateless. (Mohammad Al-Masum Molla / AFP)

About The Gallery

Carrying poultry and sacks of belongings, a second group of about 1,800 Rohingya refugees were transported by Bangladesh from cramped refugee camps on the mainland to the low-lying Bhasan Char island despite opposition from rights groups. A team of journalists were given rare access to the island that is about three hours from the nearest port in Chittagong. Bangladesh says it has spent more than $350 million of its own money to ready housing and other infrastructure to voluntarily move some 100,000 Rohingya to the island in an effort to ease overcrowding in camps near the Myanmar border.

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