Photos: Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall swings to large Danish installation

Tate Modern’s vast Turbine Hall in London has turned into a playground with huge interactive installations divided into three sections called, ‘One Two Three Swing!’ Conceptualised by Rasmus Nielsen, Jakob Fenger and Bjørnstjerne Christiansen of the Danish Art collective Superflex, this is the trio’s latest work since they came together in 1993.

UPDATED ON OCT 05, 2017 12:22 PM IST 7 Photos
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An employee sits on a swing, part of 'One Two Three Swing!' the new Turbine Hall Installation by Danish collective Superflex at the Tate Modern in London, England. The latest commission for the Turbine Hall features a giant pendulum, dozens of three seated swings and a 770 square metre, multi coloured carpet. Their huge interactive installation is divided into three sections representing apathy, production and movement . (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

An employee sits on a swing, part of 'One Two Three Swing!' the new Turbine Hall Installation by Danish collective Superflex at the Tate Modern in London, England. The latest commission for the Turbine Hall features a giant pendulum, dozens of three seated swings and a 770 square metre, multi coloured carpet. Their huge interactive installation is divided into three sections representing apathy, production and movement . (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 05, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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A woman sits on a swing at the new Turbine Hall installation at the Tate Modern in London. The museum has been turned into a playground with visitors encouraged to make new friends while contemplating on bigger issues such as community, capitalism or themselves. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

A woman sits on a swing at the new Turbine Hall installation at the Tate Modern in London. The museum has been turned into a playground with visitors encouraged to make new friends while contemplating on bigger issues such as community, capitalism or themselves. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 05, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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People lie beneath a pendulum at the Tate Modern in London. For the less active, visitors can lie on a carpet and be hypnotized by a large mirrored ball swinging from the ceiling. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

People lie beneath a pendulum at the Tate Modern in London. For the less active, visitors can lie on a carpet and be hypnotized by a large mirrored ball swinging from the ceiling. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 05, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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There are 22 three-person swings carefully arranged so that the visitors using it do not collide with each other. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

There are 22 three-person swings carefully arranged so that the visitors using it do not collide with each other. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 05, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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An employee poses below a pendulum, part of 'One Two Three Swing!' at Tate Modern in London, England. This is not the first interactive installation in Turbine Hall. Carsten Höller invited people to hurtle down his helter-skelters while Olafur Eliasson encouraged visitors to lie down and enjoy fake mist and sunshine. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

An employee poses below a pendulum, part of 'One Two Three Swing!' at Tate Modern in London, England. This is not the first interactive installation in Turbine Hall. Carsten Höller invited people to hurtle down his helter-skelters while Olafur Eliasson encouraged visitors to lie down and enjoy fake mist and sunshine. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 05, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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Achim Borchardt-Hume, Tate Modern’s director of exhibitions, called the Superflex installation ‘one of the best pieces of intelligent fun I’ve seen for a long time.’ (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

Achim Borchardt-Hume, Tate Modern’s director of exhibitions, called the Superflex installation ‘one of the best pieces of intelligent fun I’ve seen for a long time.’ (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 05, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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Members of the Danish collective Superflex (L-R) Jakob Fenger, Rasmus Nielsen and Bjornstjerne Christiansen pose during their Turbine Hall Installation at the Tate Modern in London. The trio have been working together since 1993 and are the latest artists to fill one of the most daunting and prestigious contemporary art spaces in the world. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

Members of the Danish collective Superflex (L-R) Jakob Fenger, Rasmus Nielsen and Bjornstjerne Christiansen pose during their Turbine Hall Installation at the Tate Modern in London. The trio have been working together since 1993 and are the latest artists to fill one of the most daunting and prestigious contemporary art spaces in the world. (Jack Taylor / Getty Images)

UPDATED ON OCT 05, 2017 12:22 PM IST
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