Free Covid-19 vaccines from tomorrow, pre-registration on Co-Win not mandatory | Latest News India - Hindustan Times
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Free Covid-19 vaccines from tomorrow, pre-registration on Co-Win not mandatory

By | Edited by Poulomi Ghosh
Jun 20, 2021 02:58 PM IST

As PM Modi announced on June 7, a new phase of Covid-19 vaccination will begin from June 21 where Centre will provide free vaccines to all above the age of 18 years.

The next phase of India's vaccination drive in which the Central government will provide free Covid-19 vaccines to everyone above the age of 18 years will begin from June 21, Monday, marking a significant shift from its earlier 'liberalised and accelerated' vaccination policy. As Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced on June 7, the states won't have to procure vaccines from the manufacturers. The Centre will buy 75 per cent of the vaccines and will distribute them among the states and the Union territories free of cost.

Centre will procure 75% of vaccines from manufacturers and will supply them to states free of cost, The rest 25% can be purchased by private hospitals. (PTI)
Centre will procure 75% of vaccines from manufacturers and will supply them to states free of cost, The rest 25% can be purchased by private hospitals. (PTI)

Decentralised versus centralised vaccination

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The vaccination drive in India began on January 16 From January 16 to April 30, the Centre followed a policy in which it procured 100% vaccine doses from the manufacturers and provided them to states and UTs at no cost. Frontline workers and people above the age of 45 years were the target beneficiaries during this period. From May 1, the government introduced the liberalised policy under which the Centre procured 50 per cent of the vaccines while states and private hospitals procured the rest directly from the manufacturers. Explaining the shift from this policy in a month, the health ministry said, "Many states have now communicated that they are facing difficulties in managing the funding, procurement and logistics of vaccines, impacting the pace of the National Covid Vaccination Programme. It has also been noted that smaller and remoter private hospitals are also facing constraints."

What will states do now?

States will administer the vaccine doses given by the Centre free of cost to everyone above the age of 18 years. The priority population group will be health care workers, frontline workers, citizens with 45 years of age, and then citizens whose second dose is due, followed by citizens 18 years and above. Within the population group of citizens more than 18 years of age, states/UTs may decide their own prioritisation factoring in the vaccine supply schedule, the Centre said.

Which state will get how many doses of vaccines

Population, Covid-19 caseload, vaccination wastage are some of the factors on which the Centre will decide the supply.

What will private hospitals do?

Private hospitals can procure the rest 25 per cent of the vaccine production. States/UTs would aggregate the demand of private hospitals so that all hospitals in the state get an equitable share. Private hospitals can be charged for the vaccines, but the Centre has capped the upper limit.

Co-Win registration not mandatory

From tomorrow, pre-registration on Cowin.gov.in will not be mandatory as all government and private vaccination centres would provide onsite registration facility.

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