Gurgaon: Doctors come together to treat Cerebral Palsy in children | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
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Gurgaon: Doctors come together to treat Cerebral Palsy in children

A group of doctors in Gurgaon joined hands to fight against Cerebral Palsy, a disease that occurs because of a neurological disorder

gurgaon Updated: Apr 09, 2017 23:26 IST
Ipsita Pati
Nearly 15-20% of physically disabled children in India suffer from Cerebral Palsy.
Nearly 15-20% of physically disabled children in India suffer from Cerebral Palsy.(HT Photo)

A group of doctors in the city joined hands on Sunday to fight against Cerebral Palsy, a disease that occurs because of a neurological disorder.

The initiative is significant as every three out of 1,000 children in Haryana suffer from some form of neurological disorder. The matter needs serious attention, said the doctors at a panel discussion held at a rehabilitation centre in Sector 42 on Sunday.

According to the data put out by the World Health Organisation (WHO), 10% of the global population suffers from some form of disability. In India, 3.8% of the population is affected by disabilities. What’s even more worrying is that nearly 15-20% of the physically-disabled children in India suffer from Cerebral Palsy. In Haryana, stroke is seen as one of the leading causes of disability and death.

A 12-year-old girl from Iraq,who has been suffering from Cerebral Palsy since she was 8-months-old, was administered a drug during the panel discussion.

Dr Sumit Singh, consultant neurologist, Artemis Hospital, highlighted the role of rehabilitation and drugs in management of adult spasticity, which is known as Cerebral Palsy when it affects children. “Soon, India is going to be the stroke capital of the world. To tackle the problem, we have developed a systematic unit to provide complete care for the patients to recover,” Singh said.

The condition leads of stiffness and contraction of some muscles . The doctors said that this impairs the normal body movement. They blamed the condition on lack of enough oxygen in the body at the time of birth.

Dr Ashu Rohatgi, consultant neurologist, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital threw light on spasticity management in paediatrics, saying, “As it is a neurological disorder, we have a very important role to play in guiding the patients and helping them deal with the disease,” Rohatgi said.

Dr Vipul Shandilya, medical director of Delmira Rehabilitation Services, demonstrated a live injection procedure and said that children and adult could be completely cured if provided with constant medical attention.