Delhi has worst quality of living among Indian cities | india-news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 01, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Delhi has worst quality of living among Indian cities

Delhi remained the worst among Indian cities as far as quality of living is concerned, according to the Mercer 2017 Quality of Living Index. Bengaluru ranked lowest for city infrastructure.

india Updated: Mar 15, 2017 09:49 IST
Pranav Srivilasan
Mercer 2017 Quality of Living Index

File photo of an apartment block in New Delhi.(HT Photo)

The Indian capital has earned the dubious distinction of being the worst city in the country in terms of quality of living for a second consecutive year with a global ranking of 161, according the Mercer 2017 Quality of Living Index.

Baengaluru ranked the lowest in terms of city infrastructure.

Mercer is the world’s largest human resources consulting firm headquartered in New York.

According to the survey, Indian cities have performed poorly on a globally recognized survey that ranks cities in terms of how it is to live and work in them.

Hyderabad, the highest ranked Indian city is down 5 ranks from last year’s 139 in the survey. Pune and Bengaluru have both slipped one notch to 145 and 146 respectively in this year’s ranking.

“The survey highlights that Indian cities that have been part of the survey haven’t made much progress on the quality of living scale since last year,” according to Ruchika Pal, Principal and India Practice Leader, Global Mobility, Mercer.

The only exception is Chennai, whose score has marginally improved mainly on account of public transport, including buses and a recently expanded two-line metro system, and improved availability of expat housing.

For the second year in a row, New Delhi continues to be ranked lowest, amongst the surveyed cities, with scores remaining constant. Both Hyderabad and Pune cities rank higher for quality of living than the country’s more traditional business centres, Mumbai and New Delhi that ranked 154 and 161 respectively, according to the report.

According to Navnit Singh, chairman and regional managing director of executive search firm, Korn Ferry: “Hyderabad is not at all an unattractive city for employment for talent unlike Chennai or Calcutta. Areas like Gachibowli, the new Hyderabad, with better and cheaper housing, good schools and good quality of living attract talent.”

Adds Achal Khanna, CEO, SHRM India: “Hyderabad is increasingly becoming a popular city for women given the safety factor. In terms of career progression and career opportunities for women at the senior level is yet to get a stimulus, while those at the mid-senior level have more opportunities.”

Indian cities slump in quality of life rankings
By Nandita Mathur
nandita.m@livemint.com

Indian cities have performed poorly on a globally recognized survey that ranks cities in terms of quality of life. Hyderabad, the highest ranked Indian city, is down five ranks from last year’s 139 in the Mercer 2017 Quality of Living Index. Pune and Bengaluru have both slipped by one rank to 145 and 146, respectively. For the second year in a row, New Delhi is ranked lowest among the cities surveyed in India.

Austrian capital Vienna tops the list for the eighth consecutive year. Singapore is the top Asian city on the list, and is ranked 25th.

This year, Mercer also separately ranked cities in terms of their quality of infrastructure. Singapore topped the city infrastructure ranking.

New Zealand and Australia continue to rank high: Auckland (3), Sydney (10), Wellington (15), and Melbourne (16) all remain in the top 20.

Among Indian cities, Mumbai is ranked the highest at 141, followed by Kolkata (149) and Pune (151). Bangalore was rated the lowest at 177.

Mercer’s annual index is aimed at helping companies decide on compensation for expat employees, but has, over the years, also become an important factor for people considering moving to another city for work.

“The success of foreign assignments is influenced by issues such as ease of travel and communication, sanitation standards, personal safety, and access to public services,” said Slagin Parakatil, Principal at Mercer and responsible for its quality of living research. “Multinational companies need accurate and timely information to help calculate fair and consistent expatriate compensation – a real challenge in locations with a compromised quality of living,” he said.

Is Your Couch Making You Cough?
Promotional Feature