664 acres, around 30 Oval Maidans, of open spaces in Mumbai reserved for the rich: report | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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664 acres, around 30 Oval Maidans, of open spaces in Mumbai reserved for the rich: report

Citing examples of Central Park in New York and Piedmont Park in Georgia, the report pushed for public-private partnership and formation for public benefit corporation to take care of these spaces

mumbai Updated: Oct 11, 2017 13:17 IST
Sanjana Bhalerao
The report defines open spaces as promenades, gyms and clubs, parks and gardens, playgrounds, recreation ground, beaches, swimming pools.
The report defines open spaces as promenades, gyms and clubs, parks and gardens, playgrounds, recreation ground, beaches, swimming pools.(File)

Of the 3,780 acres of public open spaces available in the city, 664 acres, which is equal to 30 Oval Maidans, is reserved for gymkhanas or clubs that are exclusively for the elite, according to a report on open spaces.

The Observer Research Foundation’s (ORF) report, Endangered Future of Mumbai’s Open Spaces, that focuses on availability of open spaces, accessibility, civic body’s budget and a slew of measures for improvement of open spaces in the city was released by chief minister Devendra Fadnavis on Tuesday.

It defines open spaces as promenades, gyms and clubs, parks and gardens, playgrounds, recreation ground, beaches, swimming pools.

The report suggests the need to form an apex multi-stakeholder committee, with citizens as its members, that will actively participate in development of spaces.

According to the study, H/east ward (Bandra east) has the least per capita available open space at 0.11 sqm, follow by C ward (Bhuleshwar, Kalbadevi, Bhendi Bazar) at 0.17sqm.

To include citizens’ suggestions to the report, the foundation carried out a residents’ survey. Of the 713 respondents, 670 wanted a ban on use of open spaces for religious or political functions, while 383 said they needed a makeover.

Citing examples of Central Park in New York and Piedmont Park in Georgia, the report pushed for public-private partnership and formation for public benefit corporation to take care of these spaces. The corporation is funded by payments from surrounding commercial and residential developments.

The report has been prepared by Gautam Kirtane, Sayli Udas Mankikar and Dwip Rachchh of the ORF.