Veterinary clinic in Boisar has no space to store costly drugs | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Veterinary clinic in Boisar has no space to store costly drugs

mumbai Updated: Nov 10, 2016 00:30 IST
Ram Parmar
veterinary medicines

Fungus has grown on some of the boxes, which have been in the open from September, said activists.(Pankaj D Raut)

Expensive medicines meant to treat animals are going to waste at a dilapidated government veterinary clinic in Boisar. Reason: lack of space and no proper facilities to store the medicines. Fungus has grown on some of the boxes, which have been in the open from September, said activists, adding that the lone veterinary doctor at the clinic is helpless, as he has no attendant to clear the mess or guard the medicines.

Besides, there is no record to audit the medicines being supplied to the clinic. As a result, there is no way to keep a track of the stock, they alleged.

The zilla parishad runs this lone vet clinic at Boisar where ailing animals of farmers from Murbhe, Navapur, Varangade, Mahagaon, Olewadi, Paam, Tembhi, Khairpada, Betegaon, Katkarpada, Dandipada and Vanjarpada, among other areas, avail of treatment.

“Dr Arun Kochre, the lone veterinary doctor at the clinic, treats at least 10 ailing animals a day. As the zilla parishad hasn’t appointed any helper or compounder, Dr Kochre ends up doing all the jobs, including treating and examining animals, putting him at the risk of being attacked by the animal. Besides, he also has to treat animals from other remote areas of the village,” said Pankaj D Raut, a social activist.

According to Raut, boxes of saline, injections and medicines are left in the open, making them unfit for use. “The animal husbandry department procures these medicines from pharma companies free of cost and supplies them to the clinic at Boisar and other such clinics in the state,” said Raut.

“My complaints to the zilla parishad to improve the infrastructure to store these medicines have fallen on deaf ears. Often, the medicines kept in the open are stolen and sold to private medical shops, forcing farmers to procure the medicines at a higher rate,” said Raut.

“This could be the tip of the iceberg,” he added.

Dr BU Bodhankar, district veterinary officer, Palghar, said, “All the medicines supplied by the government are stored carefully in cold storage and cupboards. A record of these medicines is also maintained. However, Palghar is a newly formed district and there so, there could be some problems in appointing staff at the clinic.”

Ashok Vade, chairman, agriculture and animal husbandry, zilla parishad, Palghar, said, “I have demanded an inquiry into the matter.”