50% govt quota seats to stay in SGPC-run medical institute | punjab$dont-miss | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 03, 2016-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

50% govt quota seats to stay in SGPC-run medical institute

punjab Updated: Sep 09, 2016 12:38 IST
Vivek Gupta
Vivek Gupta
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

Last month, the institute had announced to convert 65 MBBS seats under the government quota into management and NRI quota seats. (Representative image )

In a relief to medical students, the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee-run Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Science and Research, Amritsar, has decided to retain the 50% government quota MBBS seats. The seats will soon be filled through a central counselling by the Baba Farid University of Health Sciences (BFUHS), Faridkot.

Last month, the institute had announced to convert 65 MBBS seats under the government quota into management and NRI quota seats.

When contacted, institute principal Dr Geeta Sharma confirmed that the number of government quota seats would remain the same as last year.

Till last year, 75 of the 150 seats were being filled under government controlled fee structure and rest from its minority quota on which management quota fee structure was applicable. After getting the status of a private varsity a month ago, it converted 90% of its government quota seats into management seats having higher fee structure and also announced an independent counselling for the coming session.

This decision came under criticism as the fee for the five-year MBBS course under a government quota seat is Rs 13.30 lakh whereas it is Rs 40 lakh in case of the management seat.

The state government had recently clarified that the institute had not been accorded the status of a private university as the statutes and rules were yet to be approved. Secretary, medical education, Punjab, Vikas Partap said the mode of admission and the fee structure of the institute will remain the same as of last year for the coming session. “The university has not submitted its statutes and rules. Once these are approved, it can function independently,” he added

Sources said it may be the last session in the institute having government controlled seats. It is likely to get a status of a private varsity from the next session, and the fee structure and nature of seats may change.