Dieting for one year can help you stay in shape permanently | health and fitness | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 22, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Dieting for one year can help you stay in shape permanently

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found that the body’s own survival mechanism can be overcome after a year of dieting.

health and fitness Updated: Apr 19, 2016 16:09 IST
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found that the body’s own survival mechanism can be overcome after a year of dieting.
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found that the body’s own survival mechanism can be overcome after a year of dieting.(Shutterstock)

People should stick to a diet for one year to keep weight off permanently, according to a recent study.

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found that the body’s own survival mechanism can be overcome after a year of dieting, the Daily Mail reported.

Read: Don’t make these dieting blunders if you’re serious about weight loss

The human body has evolved to be resistant to losing weight, which would have helped survival in times of food scarcity, but can be an issue now food is readily available.

In the study, the team put 20 obese people on a precise diet for an eight-week period to help them lose an average of 28lbs. (Shutterstock)

Researcher Signe Sorensen Torekov told BBC Radio 4 that the huge increase in the availability of food in the past few decades had influenced weight gain around the world.

Read: Forget dieting, just add these slimming foods to your diet

In the study, the team put 20 obese people on a precise diet for an eight-week period to help them lose an average of 28lbs.

People should stick to a diet for one year to keep weight off permanently, according to a recent study. (Shutterstock)

After following a strict diet for the next 12 months, their bodies were found to produce less of the hunger-inducing hormone Ghrelin and more of the hormone GLP-1, which suppresses appetite.

The study appears in the International Journal of Obesity.