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Toxic air: Pollution could cause over 5 lakh premature deaths in India

If you are not alarmed already, it’s time you woke up to how air pollution could prove to be the biggest killer in coming years. According to a new report, air pollution could lead to up to 570,000 premature deaths in India.

health and fitness Updated: May 13, 2016 12:11 IST
ANI
Newly figures released by WHO suggests that increasing pollution is claiming 7 million lives every year around the world.
Newly figures released by WHO suggests that increasing pollution is claiming 7 million lives every year around the world.(Burhaan Kinu/HT Photo )

If you are not alarmed already, it’s time you woke up to how air pollution could prove to be the biggest killer in coming years. According to a new report, air pollution could lead to up to 570,000 premature deaths in India.

For the new study, researchers at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology and the US National Center for Atmospheric Research created computer simulations using 2011 data and found that air pollution could kill more than 570,000 people prematurely.

Read: Half of world’s 20 most polluted cities in India, Delhi in 11th position

Air pollution has been a public health concern in India for years. In February, a report by Greenpeace said it surpassed China in the quantity of fine particulate matter in the air. It found there were 128 micrograms of fine particulate matter in New Delhi’s air.

In comparison, Washington DC, had 12. The World Health Organisation recommends no more than 10 micrograms. The report said the Indo-Gangetic region, the north of the country, had the most pollution.

Read: Lazy bones, move out and cycle: Air pollution won’t affect you as much

Meanwhile, newly released figures by WHO are suggesting increasing pollution is claiming 7 million lives every year around the world. WHO Public Health Director Maria Neira says most of the deaths are being caused by simply breathing the air in polluted cities. Neira says based on their survey of some three thousand cities around the globe, the most polluted cities are still found in China and India. (ANI)