Tutak Tutak Tutiya review: Prabhudheva flaunts great comic timing amid misogyny | movie reviews | Hindustan Times
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Tutak Tutak Tutiya review: Prabhudheva flaunts great comic timing amid misogyny

From objectifying Tammannaah’s body as Ruby to showing the ‘perfect, ideal wife’ as one who meets all demands made by the insensitive husband and cooks and cleans the house, Tutak Tutak Tutiya has the entire screenplay painted with misogyny. The psychology that works behind such storylines and the one that makes films like these work, is a major problem with our filmmaking business.

movie reviews Updated: Oct 07, 2016 18:14 IST
Sweta Kaushal
From objectifying Tammannaah’s body as Ruby to showing the ‘perfect, ideal wife’ as one who meets all demands made by the insensitive husband and cooks and cleans the house, Tutak Tutak Tutiya has the entire screenplay  painted with misogyny.
From objectifying Tammannaah’s body as Ruby to showing the ‘perfect, ideal wife’ as one who meets all demands made by the insensitive husband and cooks and cleans the house, Tutak Tutak Tutiya has the entire screenplay painted with misogyny.

Tutak Tutak Tutiya
Director:
AL Vijay
Cast: Prabhudheva, Tamannaah Bhatia, Sonu Sood
Rating: 2/5

Krishna travels hundreds of kilometres from Tamil Nadu’s Coimbatore to Mumbai with a single dream - to marry a ‘modern’ girl who speaks “English without grammatical mistakes” so that his future kids can speak the language fluently.

Circumstances in his family force him to marry a village girl against his wishes. But when this ‘village girl’ transforms into a ‘modern girl’, wears short dresses and speaks fluent English, he does not quite like it.

Krishna (Prabhudheva) is the protagonist in Tamil director AL Vijay’s debut Bollywood venture, Tutak Tutak Tutiya. The movie, which marks the debut of Sonu Sood as producer, defines male chauvinism: The hero wants to marry a modern girl but when he gets one (well, in parts) he is not impressed.

The psychology that works behind such storylines and makes films like these work, is a major problem with our movie industry.

Tutak Tutak Tutiya is supposed to be a light-hearted movie with all the elements of an entertaining, masala film.

Krishna is forced to marry Devi (Tamannah), a village girl and plans to hide her in a flat in Mumbai so that none of his friends discover he is married. But there is a twist in the tale. A ghost stays in the flat- Ruby, an aspiring actress who committed suicide when her first film was cancelled. Ruby possesses Devi and uses the latter’s body to fulfil her dreams of becoming a successful actor. When Krishna finds this, he tries his best to get rid of the ghost. The film traces his struggles in the journey.

Tamannaah as the Ruby and Devi.

From objectifying Tammannaah’s body as Ruby to showing the ‘perfect, ideal wife’ as one who meets all demands made by the insensitive husband and cooks and cleans the house, Tutak Tutak Tutiya has the entire screenplay painted with misogyny.

There is drama, romance and even action in the film but the dance numbers and comic timing of Prabhudheva alone make it work. With seven songs, the flow of the movie is often interrupted but the actors will ensure you do not walk out of the movie hall midway.

Tamannah displays theatrics as the ghost.

Tamannah, who has worked in Hindi films like Entertainment, Himmatwala and Humshakals, proves her mettle - switching swiftly from the ghost’s deadpan expression to a naive village girl. As Devi, she plays a sweet, humble girl who wants to impress her husband while as Ruby she is a no--nonsense lady with the charisma and attitude apt for a star.

Tamannaah as the ghost, Ruby.

The audience of Hindi cinema has seen Prabhudheva in ABCD and the sequel but he surprises with his comic timing in Tutak Tutak Tutiya. Be it accepting publicly that he has proposed 27 girls and got rejected 30 times or playing the manager to her wife turned ghost, Prabhudeva makes us believe in every single scene as Krishna and we can’t help but enjoy it. Vijay ensures Prabhudheva’s dancing skills are well used, utilizing right from Krishna’s introduuctory scene to a few comic scenes.

The film’s misogyny aside, there are quite a few funny sequences in Tutak Tutak Tutiya. For instance the scene where Prabhudeva seeks help from Devil Travels, an agency that gets rid of ghosts with the help of ‘nimbu-mirchi’ travelling by a drone or Tammannah reacting to the excorsists saying ‘Mumbai me madaari puja karwate hain?’. Or the sequence where a woman says ‘Sharab se liver kharab hota hai, lekin dil saaf rehta hai’.

Sonu Sood, who plays the superstar making a film opposite Ruby, also impresses with his performance. If no one has cast him as the lead in a comic film yet, filmmakers might want to break some old traditions and sign him after watching the film.

Sonu Sood is all about swag and style in the movie.

If you are looking for an entertaining, paisa-vasool movie, Tutak Tutak Tutiya should be your pick. Prabhudeva’s comedy and of course, his dance is what makes this worth it. Look elsewhere for a soul-stirring piece of art.

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