People of Punjab want India and Pakistan to be friends: Mark Tully | punjab$chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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People of Punjab want India and Pakistan to be friends: Mark Tully

“Whatever is happening between India and Pakistan is sad. The people in Punjab I have spoken to want friendship between both countries and they blame politicians for this nonsense,” said Mark Tully, a well-known journalist and author.

punjab Updated: Oct 18, 2016 19:59 IST
HT Correspondent
Journalist and author Mark Tully interacting with the faculty and students at Panjab University, Chandigarh, on Monday.
Journalist and author Mark Tully interacting with the faculty and students at Panjab University, Chandigarh, on Monday.(HT Photo)

“Whatever is happening between India and Pakistan is sad. The people in Punjab I have spoken to want friendship between both countries and they blame politicians for this nonsense,” said Mark Tully, a well-known journalist and author.

Tully was in the city on Monday to interact with students and research scholars at Panjab University and address them on the topics ‘Partition and its impact on India today’, ‘Governance in India: How it can be improved’ and ‘Need for lifestyle change if we are to cope with climate change’.

Tully said Indo-Pak relations should be cordial because India has tremendous potential for governance and a rich democratic tradition. He also commented on nationalism and stated that it should be about universal brotherhood for all people and nations.

Tully emphasised on the need to reorient governance and the administrative structure. Meanwhile, he also dwelled upon the need to make lifestyle changes if we were to cope with environmental changes.

All questions raised by faculty members and students were duly answered by the senior journalist who worked with the BBC for 30 years.

Earlier, Tully visited the PU history department and interacted with the students, faculty and alumni. He also recorded a session for a BBC Radio programme on the topic ‘Partition and its impact on India’, that highlighted issues of the Partition from the point of view of young Indians today. The programme will be telecast in February 2017.

Grover spoke on history and the evolution of educational institutions in India. Later, Tully interacted with Sukhmani Bal Riar on historiographical trends of writing the history of the Partition and emphasised on recording it.

The academic interaction was organised by the department of history in collaboration with Aitihasiki (department of history PU alumni association). Tully was accompanied by BBC Radio producer Frank Sterling and journalist Gillian Wright.