35% PM10 & 19% PM2.5 coming from road dust in Pune district: ARAI

Published on Sep 19, 2022 11:45 PM IST

The city-based Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI) has formulated an emission inventory grid to find out the various types of emissions and other factors causing air pollution in Pune district

The ARAI officials along with representatives from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and TERI launched the ‘Development of Emission Inventory for Pune District’ report at the ARAI campus on Monday. (HT PHOTO)
The ARAI officials along with representatives from Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and TERI launched the ‘Development of Emission Inventory for Pune District’ report at the ARAI campus on Monday. (HT PHOTO)

The city-based Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI) has formulated an emission inventory grid to find out the various types of emissions and other factors causing air pollution in Pune district. The ARAI has identified the key sources of air pollution and their contributions through this grid.

Sharing details of the major findings of the report, Moqtik Bawase, general manager, ARAI, said, “The baseline emissions of air pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NOx, and CO) loads originating from 12 different sectors in Pune district namely transport, road dust, open waste burning, residential, industries, diesel generators, hotels, restaurants and bakeries, crematoria, agricultural residue burning, aircraft and construction have been quantified.”

“The emission inventory of city areas is found to be dominated by transport-related emissions such as vehicular exhaust and road dust re-suspension followed by open waste burning and hotels and restaurants. This can be attributed to densely populated areas with higher vehicular movement. The emissions from rural areas are mainly dominated by agricultural residue burning and residential cooking and heating emissions,” Bawase said.

As per the inventory, for PM2.5 which is one of the main pollutants, the breakdown is: transport (20%), road dust (19%), industries (19%), agricultural waste (10%), construction and allied sectors (12%), residential and open waste burning (6% each), and diesel gensets (4%). The major sources of PM10 in Pune district include road dust (35%), construction and allied activities (23%), industries (14%), and transport (10%) while PM2.5 emissions are primarily dominated by transport (20%), road dust and industry (19% each) and construction and allied activities (13%).

The emission inventory for baseline year 2021 has been developed using scientific tools and techniques, and with due consideration to the quality assurance and control aspects. A dedicated team of about 30 members has worked extensively to generate the field data. Additionally, secondary data provided by the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB) and Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) has also been included in the analysis. High-resolution satellite images and GIS tools have been utilised to identify the sources of air pollution. While the study has been reviewed by professor Mukesh Sharma of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kanpur and Dr Sachin Ghude, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune.

A A Deshpande, senior deputy director, ARAI, said, “ARAI has prepared this emission inventory programme for Pune district, and its official report was launched Monday. Emission inventory data has been studied at the base level and henceforth, we will carry out improvements supposedly related to electric vehicles which will be useful to assess the effectiveness of various measures taken by the authorities to improve the air quality of Pune district. Based on our study, the authorities will take decisions. Our study will be useful for policy makers to plan industry, transport and waste management systems.”

Along with Bawase and Deshpande, S S Thipse, senior deputy director, ARAI; R Suresh, fellow and area convenor, TERI; Dr Jonathan Demenge, head of cooperation, New Delhi; André Daniel Mueller, programme officer; Anand Shukla, senior advisor, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC); and other stakeholders working in the field of air quality management were also present at the launch of the emission inventory report on Monday at ARAI.

Outlining the efforts taken by ARAI to combat air pollution, Thipse said, “ARAI is working on E20, which is a 20% blend of ethanol and gasoline (petrol) whose benefits include lower emission and pollution as well as promotion of biofuel that will benefit the agricultural sector in India.”

“Hydrogen is the cleanest fuel as it does not contain carbon and is being promoted as fuel for both IC engines and fuel cell vehicles. The National Hydrogen Mission Plan, launched by Honourable Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi, seeks to create infrastructure and promote the use of hydrogen in Indian vehicles,” Thipse said.

The ‘development of emission inventory for Pune district’ has been undertaken under the ‘Clean Air Project (CAP) India’ linked to the ‘National Clean Air Programme’ launched in 2019 for better air quality in 132 non-attainment cities. CAP India - implemented by a consortium of institutions led by TERI, New Delhi – is assisting stakeholders such as the MPCB and PMC in effective implementation of an action plan for air quality management.

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