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Tuesday, Nov 12, 2019

Stone-paved pathway from the Mughal-era found at Red Fort

The historic stretch, which measures approximately three metres in width and five metres in length, came to light when the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) began digging in the area a month ago.

delhi Updated: Nov 02, 2019 16:41 IST
Adrija Roychowdhury
Adrija Roychowdhury
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
The historic stretch at Red Fort in  Delhicame to light when the ASI began digging in the area a month ago.
The historic stretch at Red Fort in Delhicame to light when the ASI began digging in the area a month ago.(HT Photo )
         

A late-Mughal era stone paved pathway has been unearthed in front of the Delhi gate of Red Fort.

The historic stretch, which measures approximately three metres in width and five metres in length, came to light when the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) began digging in the area a month ago.

“In the last 100-150 years, the pathway kept getting covered by layers of concrete. We began digging here to determine the original level at which the road was situated,” an ASI official said.

The pathway is located about two feet below the current road level near the Delhi gate.

Speaking about the future of the pathway, the official said they are still discussing how to go about its conservation. “We are deciding between two possibilities. First is that we record the make and features of the pathway and cover it up. The other option is that we display it for public to see, in which case we will have to document the pathway, remove the stones, and then re-lay them at a slightly elevated height,” the official said.

He said “they are trying to go ahead with the second option. However elevating and re-laying the pathway will take more time.”

Large parts of the Red Fort complex has been altered, first by the British, after the 1857 rebellion, and then later after the Independence of the country.

“If you look at old photographs of the 1911 Durbar, they show that the road level was much lower. It is a good move on the part of the ASI to bring back the road level by undoing insensitive modification in the past,” said historian Swapna Liddle about the historical significance of the pathway.