Photos: The Delhi policemen keeping crime scenes alive

Delhi Police’s crime scene photographers capture everything from murder, robbery, fatal accidents, burglaries and thefts. They are the first at a crime spot. Their photographs ensure that a crime scene always remains alive, and help a judge see how the untouched crime scene looked. The job also carries a lot of mental baggage as the photographers at times are involved in severely gory cases something which also affects their relationship with their families. Each of Delhi’s 13 major policing districts has a crime team, which comprises 2-3 photographers. Currently, a batch of 30 policemen is under training and soon to become a crime scene photographer.

Updated On Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST
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A crime photographer is seen at work, in New Delhi. A team of policemen were busy investigating the vehicle when a tall man, dressed in formals arrived, cameras slung from his shoulders. He cautiously took his position, aimed at the vehicle and clicked away. He is part of the Delhi Police’s 60-member crime-scene photographers’ team that photographs everything from the untouched crime spot to important objects and documents associated with a crime. (HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST

A crime photographer is seen at work, in New Delhi. A team of policemen were busy investigating the vehicle when a tall man, dressed in formals arrived, cameras slung from his shoulders. He cautiously took his position, aimed at the vehicle and clicked away. He is part of the Delhi Police’s 60-member crime-scene photographers’ team that photographs everything from the untouched crime spot to important objects and documents associated with a crime. (HT Photo)

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A forensic photographer works in his lab. Assistant sub-inspector (ASI) Virender Singh who is currently posted with the crime branch, has photographed at least 4,000 crime spots in his 15-year career. “We have captured everything — murder, robbery, fatal accidents etc. We are the first at a crime spot. Our photographs ensure that a crime scene always remains alive; they help a judge to see how the untouched crime scene looked,” said Singh. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST

A forensic photographer works in his lab. Assistant sub-inspector (ASI) Virender Singh who is currently posted with the crime branch, has photographed at least 4,000 crime spots in his 15-year career. “We have captured everything — murder, robbery, fatal accidents etc. We are the first at a crime spot. Our photographs ensure that a crime scene always remains alive; they help a judge to see how the untouched crime scene looked,” said Singh. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

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Investigators also rely on these photographs for evidence. Once the photographers and forensics experts are done with a crime spot, investigators take over. “We cannot return to the crime scene to capture anything that was missed earlier as it may have lost its originality,” Singh said. However, the job is not done with taking pictures of the crime spot alone; they remain associated with a case throughout the investigation and prosecution. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST

Investigators also rely on these photographs for evidence. Once the photographers and forensics experts are done with a crime spot, investigators take over. “We cannot return to the crime scene to capture anything that was missed earlier as it may have lost its originality,” Singh said. However, the job is not done with taking pictures of the crime spot alone; they remain associated with a case throughout the investigation and prosecution. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

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Ganeshan, a senior Delhi Police photographer, was one of the cameramen at the scene post the 2001 terrorist attack on Parliament, Phoolan Devi murder, and the 2011 Delhi High Court blasts.“We also spend hours with doctors clicking pictures as they conduct the autopsy,” he said. Sometimes, the photographers are summoned by courts to testify that a particular picture was taken by them. In some cases, cross-examinations also follow. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST

Ganeshan, a senior Delhi Police photographer, was one of the cameramen at the scene post the 2001 terrorist attack on Parliament, Phoolan Devi murder, and the 2011 Delhi High Court blasts.“We also spend hours with doctors clicking pictures as they conduct the autopsy,” he said. Sometimes, the photographers are summoned by courts to testify that a particular picture was taken by them. In some cases, cross-examinations also follow. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

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Sanjeev Kumar Gupta, in-charge, Crime Scene Management Division, at Delhi government’s Forensic Science Laboratory believes that crime-scene photography plays a crucial role in reconstructing a crime scene. “It helps in cases of death by fall, where we need to prepare a dummy of the victim’s weight and build. Besides, it is a permanent record of a crime which is used during trial as most witnesses don’t remember minute details of the crime scene”. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST

Sanjeev Kumar Gupta, in-charge, Crime Scene Management Division, at Delhi government’s Forensic Science Laboratory believes that crime-scene photography plays a crucial role in reconstructing a crime scene. “It helps in cases of death by fall, where we need to prepare a dummy of the victim’s weight and build. Besides, it is a permanent record of a crime which is used during trial as most witnesses don’t remember minute details of the crime scene”. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

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“Visiting spots where children are killed is very disturbing; it gives us nightmares involving our own family,” said Shiv Om Chauhan. He is presently attached with district crime team at Old Delhi railway station and has photographed as many as 5,000 crime spots. Photographing accident scenes at railway tracks can be cerebral as it often involves severely mutilated bodies. The photographers say they do not discuss work at home because it affects their families too. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST

“Visiting spots where children are killed is very disturbing; it gives us nightmares involving our own family,” said Shiv Om Chauhan. He is presently attached with district crime team at Old Delhi railway station and has photographed as many as 5,000 crime spots. Photographing accident scenes at railway tracks can be cerebral as it often involves severely mutilated bodies. The photographers say they do not discuss work at home because it affects their families too. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

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A forensic photographer’s kit consists of highly advanced cameras, colour filters, measuring scales, infrared and ultraviolet lights, gloves and masks. The infrared lights are used to find fingerprints on surfaces where they are not visible with the naked eye. The measuring scale is perhaps the most important tool as it is placed next to all evidence found at the crime scene to give an idea of its size to investigators. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST

A forensic photographer’s kit consists of highly advanced cameras, colour filters, measuring scales, infrared and ultraviolet lights, gloves and masks. The infrared lights are used to find fingerprints on surfaces where they are not visible with the naked eye. The measuring scale is perhaps the most important tool as it is placed next to all evidence found at the crime scene to give an idea of its size to investigators. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

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Each of Delhi’s 13 major policing districts has a crime team, which comprises 2-3 photographers. They work in shifts so that at least one of them is available round the clock. Deputy Commissioner of Police (Crime) Rajan Bhagat said crime photographers join the force as constables and are entitled to salaries according to their rank. Each photographer undergoes a six-month special training to qualify and at present, a batch of 30 policemen is under training. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2019 04:15 PM IST

Each of Delhi’s 13 major policing districts has a crime team, which comprises 2-3 photographers. They work in shifts so that at least one of them is available round the clock. Deputy Commissioner of Police (Crime) Rajan Bhagat said crime photographers join the force as constables and are entitled to salaries according to their rank. Each photographer undergoes a six-month special training to qualify and at present, a batch of 30 policemen is under training. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

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