Photos: Myanmar police cracks down on crowds defying protest ban

  • The biggest protests in more than a decade have swept Myanmar to denounce the coup and demand the release of Aung San Suu Kyi. The deposed 75-year-old elected leader first came to prominence in 1988 during a very different generation of protests against an earlier junta. At least 20 protesters were injured after police used rubber bullets in the capital Naypyidaw during the most serious clashes on February 9, according to a network of medics supporting the protests. In the northern city of Mandalay, witnesses told Bloomberg security forces blasted tear gas and water cannons, while police threatened to disburse large crowds that gathered in the commercial capital of Yangon.
PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST 9 Photos
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Protesters take part in a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on February 9. Police fired gunshots into the air and used water cannon and rubber bullets on February 9 as protesters across Myanmar defied bans on big gatherings to oppose a military coup that halted a tentative transition to democracy.( Sai Aung Main / AFP)

Protesters take part in a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on February 9. Police fired gunshots into the air and used water cannon and rubber bullets on February 9 as protesters across Myanmar defied bans on big gatherings to oppose a military coup that halted a tentative transition to democracy.( Sai Aung Main / AFP)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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Protesters take part in a demonstration demanding the release of Aung San Suu Kyi in Yangon on February 9. The February 1 coup and detention of elected civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi has brought the largest demonstrations in more than a decade and a growing civil disobedience movement affecting hospitals, schools and government offices.(Sai Aung Main / AFP)

Protesters take part in a demonstration demanding the release of Aung San Suu Kyi in Yangon on February 9. The February 1 coup and detention of elected civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi has brought the largest demonstrations in more than a decade and a growing civil disobedience movement affecting hospitals, schools and government offices.(Sai Aung Main / AFP)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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Protesters and police are seen in a rally against the military coup, in Naypyitaw on February 8. Witnesses told Reuters that police fired guns into the air in Naypyitaw as a crowd refused to disperse on the fourth straight day of protests. One witness told Reuters that demonstrators ran away as guns were fired into the air.(REUTERS)

Protesters and police are seen in a rally against the military coup, in Naypyitaw on February 8. Witnesses told Reuters that police fired guns into the air in Naypyitaw as a crowd refused to disperse on the fourth straight day of protests. One witness told Reuters that demonstrators ran away as guns were fired into the air.(REUTERS)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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A police truck sprays water to a crowd of protesters in Naypyitaw on February 8. Tension in the confrontations between the authorities and demonstrators against last week's coup boiled over February 8 as police fired a water cannon at peaceful protesters in the capital.(AP)

A police truck sprays water to a crowd of protesters in Naypyitaw on February 8. Tension in the confrontations between the authorities and demonstrators against last week's coup boiled over February 8 as police fired a water cannon at peaceful protesters in the capital.(AP)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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Protesters regroup after police fired warning-shots and used water cannons during a protest in Mandalay, on February 9.(AP)

Protesters regroup after police fired warning-shots and used water cannons during a protest in Mandalay, on February 9.(AP)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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Police remove a sticker from a police vehicle during a protest against the military coup, in Naypyitaw on February 8. The unrest has revived memories of almost half a century of direct army rule until the military began a process of withdrawing from civilian politics in 2011, though it never gave up its overall control over the Suu Kyi's civilian government after it won a 2015 election.(REUTERS)

Police remove a sticker from a police vehicle during a protest against the military coup, in Naypyitaw on February 8. The unrest has revived memories of almost half a century of direct army rule until the military began a process of withdrawing from civilian politics in 2011, though it never gave up its overall control over the Suu Kyi's civilian government after it won a 2015 election.(REUTERS)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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Protesters take part during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on February 9. Promises on Monday from junta leader General Min Aung Hlaing to eventually hold a new election in his first address since seizing power drew scorn. He repeated unproven accusations of fraud in the election which he used to justify the coup.(Ye Aung Thu / AFP)

Protesters take part during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on February 9. Promises on Monday from junta leader General Min Aung Hlaing to eventually hold a new election in his first address since seizing power drew scorn. He repeated unproven accusations of fraud in the election which he used to justify the coup.(Ye Aung Thu / AFP)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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Demonstrators display placards during a protest against last week's coup in Yangon, on February 9. Protesters have continued to gather, breaching a new military orer banning public gatherings of five or more issued on February 8 and intended to crack down on peaceful public protests opposing their takeover.(AP)

Demonstrators display placards during a protest against last week's coup in Yangon, on February 9. Protesters have continued to gather, breaching a new military orer banning public gatherings of five or more issued on February 8 and intended to crack down on peaceful public protests opposing their takeover.(AP)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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A nurse shows the three-finger salute as she takes part in a protest against the military coup and to demand the release of elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi, in Yangon, on February 8. Activists are also seeking the abolition of a 2008 constitution drawn up under military supervision that gave the generals a veto in parliament and control of several ministries, and for a federal system in ethnically diverse Myanmar.(REUTERS)

A nurse shows the three-finger salute as she takes part in a protest against the military coup and to demand the release of elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi, in Yangon, on February 8. Activists are also seeking the abolition of a 2008 constitution drawn up under military supervision that gave the generals a veto in parliament and control of several ministries, and for a federal system in ethnically diverse Myanmar.(REUTERS)

PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 03:52 PM IST
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