Hundreds of cancer patients have benefitted from using computer algorithms to manage their symptoms and improve their wellbeing in a unique UK trial.(Yahoo)
Hundreds of cancer patients have benefitted from using computer algorithms to manage their symptoms and improve their wellbeing in a unique UK trial.(Yahoo)

New tech helping cancer patients manage symptoms

Hundreds of cancer patients have benefitted from using computer algorithms to manage their symptoms and improve their wellbeing in a unique UK trial.
ANI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 11, 2021 05:56 PM IST

Hundreds of cancer patients have benefitted from using computer algorithms to manage their symptoms and improve their wellbeing in a unique UK trial.

The early-stage colorectal, breast or gynaecological cancer patients took part in the trial of the eRAPID system, developed by the University of Leeds, which allowed them to report online symptoms from home and receive instant advice on whether to self-manage or seek medical attention.

Patients reported better symptom control and physical wellbeing in the early weeks of treatment, with the system preventing symptom deterioration in about 9 per cent of patients after 12 weeks. Patients reported more confidence in managing their health at the end of their four-month trial period.

The results demonstrate that improvements to patients' physical wellbeing can be achieved in a cost-effective way without increasing clinicians' workload.

It is the first such trial to offer automated advice, and one of only a few to focus mainly on early-stage patients whose treatment aims to cure cancer.

"Rising numbers of cancer patients are receiving a range of anti-cancer treatments which means patients are living longer and require longer periods of care and monitoring," Programme lead Professor Galina Velikova, at the Leeds Institute of Medical Research at St James's, University of Leeds, and the Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, said.

"Remote online monitoring options have the potential to be a patient-centred, safe and effective approach to support patients during cancer treatment and manage the growing clinical workload for cancer care," added Velikova.

"The encouraging results from this study will help pave the way for future development and refinement of these interventions in broader cancer settings. The COVID19 pandemic highlighted the need and speeded a shift towards technology-enabled care, so these study results are very timely," Dr Kate Absolom, University Academic Fellow in the Leeds Institute of Medical Research at St James's and the Leeds Institute of Health Sciences at the University of Leeds, said.

Cancer patients can experience a range of symptoms, which can be caused by cancer itself, by other conditions, or by side effects from chemotherapy and other treatments, which are sometimes life-threatening and require emergency hospitalisation.

Symptoms can significantly lower patients' quality of life. Better monitoring and management can improve treatment delivery and reduce patients' physical distress.

Funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the eRAPID trial set out to establish whether symptom control could be improved using automated advice, to try to improve patients' wellbeing.

It included 508 patients aged 18 to 86 who were starting chemotherapy at Leeds Cancer Centre. All patients received their usual care, with 256 receiving the eRAPID system as additional care.

Participants answered a set of cancer-specific questions through an online symptom report once a week, or when new symptoms emerged, over the 18-week study period. Using symptom severity grades, a computer algorithm designed by the researchers and clinicians scored all the responses and determined the advice patients received.

Questions covered pain levels, nausea, spending time in bed and not meeting family needs. Participants received immediate advice on symptom management or a prompt to contact the hospital. Symptom reports were immediately displayed in the patients' electronic records, and email alerts for severe symptom reports were sent directly to clinicians.

A total of 3,314 online reports were completed, reporting 18,867 individual symptoms - an average of 13 reports per patient. Emergency alerts were sent 29 times (under 1 per cent), while serious symptoms not requiring immediate medical attention were reported on 461 occasions (14 per cent). More than 80 per cent of self-reported symptoms triggered self-management advice, providing a cost-effective solution with better outcomes for patients.

Clinical benefits in patients' physical wellbeing were seen particularly at the early period of treatment, between weeks 6 and 12, when challenges in controlling side-effects are expected.

The immediate advice increased patient confidence in managing mild and moderate treatment-related symptoms, which can significantly impact patients' quality of life and ability to continue treatment.

And trial data showed no increase in hospital workload, no differences in chemotherapy delivery, and no compromise of patient safety.

"This study provides timely and important evidence that remote real-time monitoring of cancer patients, particularly essential during pandemic conditions, is feasible and can improve patients' physical wellbeing," Julia Brown, Professor of Clinical Trials Research and Director of the University of Leeds Institute of Clinical Trials Research, in the School of Medicine, said.

This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
app
Close
An Indian-origin expert at the University of Birmingham has led an international study which finds that patients’ chances of survival after cancer surgery is strongly linked with the standard of post-operative hospital care.(Unsplash)
An Indian-origin expert at the University of Birmingham has led an international study which finds that patients’ chances of survival after cancer surgery is strongly linked with the standard of post-operative hospital care.(Unsplash)

Indian-origin expert leads UK study on cancer survival chances

PTI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 22, 2021 06:06 PM IST
An Indian-origin expert at the University of Birmingham has led an international study which finds that patients’ chances of survival after cancer surgery is strongly linked with the standard of post-operative hospital care.
Close
Spinal cord injuries in humans, often caused by sports or traffic accidents, leave them paralyzed because not all of the nerve fibers that carry information between muscles and the brain are able to grow back.(Unsplash)
Spinal cord injuries in humans, often caused by sports or traffic accidents, leave them paralyzed because not all of the nerve fibers that carry information between muscles and the brain are able to grow back.(Unsplash)

German scientists make paralyzed mice walk again

Reuters, Germany
PUBLISHED ON JAN 22, 2021 03:19 PM IST
German researchers have enabled mice paralyzed after spinal cord injuries to walk again, re-establishing a neural link hitherto considered irreparable in mammals by using a designer protein injected into the brain.
Close
 (HT llustration: Gajanan Nirphale)
(HT llustration: Gajanan Nirphale)

In her element: Talking to theoretical physicist Rohini M Godbole

PUBLISHED ON JAN 22, 2021 03:04 PM IST
Godbole, who recently received the Order of Merit from France, has dedicated her life to the pure sciences, and to bringing more women into the field. Why is that so crucial? Because what you study is partly defined by who you are, she says.
Close
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of an apoptotic cell (green) infected with SARS-COV-2 virus particles (yellow), also known as novel coronavirus, isolated from a patient sample(REUTERS)
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of an apoptotic cell (green) infected with SARS-COV-2 virus particles (yellow), also known as novel coronavirus, isolated from a patient sample(REUTERS)

Study sheds light on role played by immune system's T-cells against coronavirus

PTI, Los Angeles
PUBLISHED ON JAN 22, 2021 02:45 PM IST
In particular, they said "memory" CD8 T cells are important for protecting the body from reinfection against many viruses.
Close
A new study has found out that Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), which is a non-invasive way of stimulating the brain over the Wernicke's area, may lead to new assistive neurotechnologies for the rehabilitation of people with cognitive disorders in future.(ANI)
A new study has found out that Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), which is a non-invasive way of stimulating the brain over the Wernicke's area, may lead to new assistive neurotechnologies for the rehabilitation of people with cognitive disorders in future.(ANI)

Direct current stimulation over brain's Wernicke area can help learning words

ANI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 22, 2021 02:02 PM IST
A new study has found out that Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), which is a non-invasive way of stimulating the brain over the Wernicke's area, may lead to new assistive neurotechnologies for the rehabilitation of people with cognitive disorders in future.
Close
Scientists know that SARS-CoV-2 binds the ACE2 receptor on the surface of human cells, after which it enters the cell through a process known as endocytosis.(AFP)
Scientists know that SARS-CoV-2 binds the ACE2 receptor on the surface of human cells, after which it enters the cell through a process known as endocytosis.(AFP)

New study explains how SARS-CoV-2 may seize human cells

ANI, Washington
PUBLISHED ON JAN 22, 2021 10:03 AM IST
The findings also highlight that the possibilities could potentially serve as targets for new therapies for patients with Covid-19, although validation in cells and animal models is needed.
Close
Representational image(Unsplash)
Representational image(Unsplash)

Behind those dancing robots, scientists had to bust a move

AP
PUBLISHED ON JAN 21, 2021 11:46 PM IST
Behind those dancing robots, scientists had to bust a move
Close
A KAIST team's mathematical modelling has revealed that efficient brain circuitry develops spontaneously by showing that the topographic tiling of cortical maps originates from bottom-up projections from the periphery.(ANI)
A KAIST team's mathematical modelling has revealed that efficient brain circuitry develops spontaneously by showing that the topographic tiling of cortical maps originates from bottom-up projections from the periphery.(ANI)

Study reveals how efficient brain circuitry develops spontaneously

ANI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 20, 2021 04:20 PM IST
A KAIST team's mathematical modelling has revealed that efficient brain circuitry develops spontaneously by showing that the topographic tiling of cortical maps originates from bottom-up projections from the periphery.
Close
Immunotherapies are cancer drugs that essentially block the "don't-eat-me" signal coming from cancer and allow the immune-system to kill it. (Representative Image)(ANI)
Immunotherapies are cancer drugs that essentially block the "don't-eat-me" signal coming from cancer and allow the immune-system to kill it. (Representative Image)(ANI)

Researchers find how cancer can be killed by body's own immune system

ANI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 17, 2021 03:12 PM IST
In a previous study, scientists at the Cancer Research Center and the University of Missouri developed a genetically distinct and non-toxic strain of salmonella called CRC2631 to select and kill cancer cells.
Close
Painters refurbish the NASA logo on the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.(AFP)
Painters refurbish the NASA logo on the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.(AFP)

NASA test of mega Moon rocket engines cut short

AFP
PUBLISHED ON JAN 17, 2021 12:54 PM IST
  • Despite being cut short, NASA said the test of the RS-25 engines had provided valuable information for the planned missions.
Close
Space Launch System's hot fire test, expected to begin at 5 pm(@NASA/Twitter )
Space Launch System's hot fire test, expected to begin at 5 pm(@NASA/Twitter )

NASA's Boeing moon rocket set for 'once-in-a-generation' ground test

Reuters, Washington
PUBLISHED ON JAN 16, 2021 07:33 PM IST
The expendable super heavy-lift SLS is three years behind schedule and nearly $3 billion over budget.
Close
An innovative way to learn about the elements of the periodic table has been introduced through a study led by researchers of American Chemical Society (ACS).(ANI)
An innovative way to learn about the elements of the periodic table has been introduced through a study led by researchers of American Chemical Society (ACS).(ANI)

Scientists introduce new twist to learning periodic table

ANI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 16, 2021 05:09 PM IST
An innovative way to learn about the elements of the periodic table has been introduced through a study led by researchers of American Chemical Society (ACS).
Close
Scientists studying the body's natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient, taurine that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn).(ANI)
Scientists studying the body's natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient, taurine that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn).(ANI)

Scientists identify nutrient that helps prevent bacterial infection

ANI
UPDATED ON JAN 16, 2021 04:10 PM IST
Scientists studying the body's natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient, taurine that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn).
Close
The faculty of health and medical sciences from the University of Copenhagen have developed a ground-breaking technique that can assist to disentangle the secrets of the human intestinal microbes.(ANI)
The faculty of health and medical sciences from the University of Copenhagen have developed a ground-breaking technique that can assist to disentangle the secrets of the human intestinal microbes.(ANI)

Artificial Intelligence to map human Intestinal Bacteria

ANI
UPDATED ON JAN 16, 2021 11:54 AM IST
The faculty of health and medical sciences from the University of Copenhagen have developed a ground-breaking technique that can assist to disentangle the secrets of the human intestinal microbes.
Close
Malaria killed more than 400,000 people across the world in 2019, according to the latest WHO figures, all but a few thousand of them in Africa. There were 229 million cases across the world, 215 million of them on the continent.(Representative image)
Malaria killed more than 400,000 people across the world in 2019, according to the latest WHO figures, all but a few thousand of them in Africa. There were 229 million cases across the world, 215 million of them on the continent.(Representative image)

South African scientists discover new chemicals that kill malaria parasite

Reuters, Johannesburg
UPDATED ON JAN 15, 2021 10:11 PM IST
The World Health Organisation said in November that deaths from malaria due to disruption during the coronavirus pandemic to services designed to tackle the mosquito-borne disease will far exceed those killed by Covid-19 in sub-Saharan Africa.
Close
SHARE
Story Saved
OPEN APP