Narco tests show Nagoru knew about Samjhauta blasts | india | Hindustan Times
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Narco tests show Nagoru knew about Samjhauta blasts

india Updated: Sep 10, 2008 00:37 IST
Presley Thomas
Presley Thomas
Hindustan Times
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Safdar Nagori, the chief of SIMI’s extremist wing, was at a hospital in Bhopal to nurse a fractured hand when bombs went off in two coaches of Samjhauta Express on February 18, 2007. Though nursing his injury in a far away hospital in Madhya Pradesh, Nagori new well in advance that the train connecting India and Pakistan would be bombed.

Abdul Razzaq, a SIMI activist from Indore, had informed Nagori that blasts in the train were to be carried out with the help of a few Pakistani nationals. The startling revelation comes from the report of Narco Analysis Tests conducted on top SIMI leaders at Bangalore in April, 2008 that includes Safdar Nagori, Kamruddin Nagori and Amil Parvez, a copy of which is with HT.

Dr B.M. Mohan, director of forensic science laboratory in Bangalore, which undertook the narco analysis of the SIMI leaders, said that Safdar had revealed about Razzak’s involvement in the Samjhauta Express blasts. “Even Amil Parvez confessed the same during Narco Analysis Test,” said Dr Mohan.

But surprisingly, Razzaq, who was arrested in March after Madhya Pradesh police went into an overdrive to nab SIMI activists, is still not booked for his involvement in the blasts. He has been booked under the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act for being associated with a banned organisation.

Anil Kumar, Inspector General of Police (Indore Range), who had interrogated all the top SIMI leaders and Razzak, confirmed about Abdul Razzak’s involvement in the Samjhauta blasts case but refused to divulge any further detail.

“Razzak is in judicial custody and police officials investigating the blasts case can put an application before a local court and obtain his custody,” said Anil Kumar. But authorities from Haryana, the state police of which are investigating the case, do not seemed informed.

Firoza Mehrotra, principal secretary (home) to Haryana government said, “We definitely would want to crack the case. But I am not aware of the field details.” However, R. S. Dalal, the Haryana Director General of Police did not respond to repeated phone calls.

Kamruddin and Amil Parvez in their Narco-Analysis Tests have admitted that Abdul Razzak was very close to Nagori and that Razzak had informed Nagori and discussed about the Samjhauta Express blasts. Parvez has also named Raiz and Azhar as two very close associates of Razzak.

Safdar, though in his Narco Test, denied that any meeting was held to plot the blast, he said that Razzak had informed him about a few people from Pakistan living in Indore.

A team of Haryana police, investigating the case, had questioned a tailor who admitted that the handwriting on the suitcase was his. The tailor had confessed to stitching covers for the suitcases but despite several rounds of questioning, he failed to identify the sketches released by the police.

Safdar also said that Razzak had helped the Pakistanis in the Samjhauta Express blast and was to carry out one target (sic). Razzak had also informed him that he had taken the help of Misbah-ul-Islam from West Bengal, a top SIMI leader.