Photos: A photographer takes stock of Puerto Rico as storm season returns

Updated On Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST
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Roberto Figueroa stands eight months later, holding a photo taken on October 5, 2017 of him at his seaside home that was destroyed by Hurricane Maria, on the same property in Puerto Rico. Figueroa, who found a job at a pizzeria is aiming to rebuild his home and has re-appealed after his federal aid application was rejected twice. He visits his property daily to feed and take care of his pet dog. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

Roberto Figueroa stands eight months later, holding a photo taken on October 5, 2017 of him at his seaside home that was destroyed by Hurricane Maria, on the same property in Puerto Rico. Figueroa, who found a job at a pizzeria is aiming to rebuild his home and has re-appealed after his federal aid application was rejected twice. He visits his property daily to feed and take care of his pet dog. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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An image of a US army helicopter transporting material to repair the damaged Guajataca Dam during the hurricane is seen in at the same location as repairs continue. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) distributed 59,000 plastic sheets to homeowners who lost their roofs to Irma or Maria. But only 21,000 households have so far received federal aid to carry out permanent repairs. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

An image of a US army helicopter transporting material to repair the damaged Guajataca Dam during the hurricane is seen in at the same location as repairs continue. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) distributed 59,000 plastic sheets to homeowners who lost their roofs to Irma or Maria. But only 21,000 households have so far received federal aid to carry out permanent repairs. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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Rafael Reyes sits at his property in the San Lorenzo neighbourhood of Morovis holding a photo of him taken on October 7, 2017 amid his rubbled wooden home. The 41-year-old father and husband who collects Social Security has been living with his in-laws and said he plans to begin rebuilding work with FEMA’s $31,000 assistance. Instead of wood, Reyes said this time he’ll build with stones. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

Rafael Reyes sits at his property in the San Lorenzo neighbourhood of Morovis holding a photo of him taken on October 7, 2017 amid his rubbled wooden home. The 41-year-old father and husband who collects Social Security has been living with his in-laws and said he plans to begin rebuilding work with FEMA’s $31,000 assistance. Instead of wood, Reyes said this time he’ll build with stones. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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William Fontan Quintero and his wife Yadira Sostre in Morovis pose with a printed photo shot in their home destroyed by the hurricane last year. Since then, they’ve built a small wooden house with help from family where they live with their two children. Like many, they are still waiting for FEMA’s approval to build a permanent house. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

William Fontan Quintero and his wife Yadira Sostre in Morovis pose with a printed photo shot in their home destroyed by the hurricane last year. Since then, they’ve built a small wooden house with help from family where they live with their two children. Like many, they are still waiting for FEMA’s approval to build a permanent house. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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A printed photograph taken on September 28, 2017 shows people bathing on the highway after Hurricane Maria, as motorcyclists ride past the same location on May 27, 2018. FEMA officials said that longstanding rules prevent federal officials from granting reconstruction aid to victims who don’t have titles to homes. In many cases, storm victims were informally given property by a relative or inherited without a will or deed. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

A printed photograph taken on September 28, 2017 shows people bathing on the highway after Hurricane Maria, as motorcyclists ride past the same location on May 27, 2018. FEMA officials said that longstanding rules prevent federal officials from granting reconstruction aid to victims who don’t have titles to homes. In many cases, storm victims were informally given property by a relative or inherited without a will or deed. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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A photograph of a jeep crossing a river on October 7, 2017 is placed on the new bridge that stands where the storm washed out the old one. Because of its collapse, people on both sides were left stranded, turning a 45 minute commute to the other side into a three hour odyssey. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

A photograph of a jeep crossing a river on October 7, 2017 is placed on the new bridge that stands where the storm washed out the old one. Because of its collapse, people on both sides were left stranded, turning a 45 minute commute to the other side into a three hour odyssey. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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AP photographer Ramon Espinosa holds a photo taken on September 29, 2017 showing police lifting the coffin of an officer killed during the hurricane while crossing a river. Eight months since, local police still lack about a dozen officers due to resignations and retirements. Puerto Rico’s bankruptcy has frozen promotions, salaries, new hires and even shut some police academies. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

AP photographer Ramon Espinosa holds a photo taken on September 29, 2017 showing police lifting the coffin of an officer killed during the hurricane while crossing a river. Eight months since, local police still lack about a dozen officers due to resignations and retirements. Puerto Rico’s bankruptcy has frozen promotions, salaries, new hires and even shut some police academies. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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A photo print is kept at the same spot where Puerto Rican National Guards delivered food and water to desperate residents in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on a farm in Morovis. For two months after the storm’s passing, stranded residents would come to this spot for supplies handed out by the National Guard. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

A photo print is kept at the same spot where Puerto Rican National Guards delivered food and water to desperate residents in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on a farm in Morovis. For two months after the storm’s passing, stranded residents would come to this spot for supplies handed out by the National Guard. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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Blanca Rivera and Eduard Rodriguez hold a photo of them that was taken on September 30, 2017 as they slept in their car after their home was destroyed by Hurricane Maria. The couple said they sold their car to build a room after FEMA rejected their request for financial help to rebuild their home, “It’s sad,” Rodriguez said. “So sad.” (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

Blanca Rivera and Eduard Rodriguez hold a photo of them that was taken on September 30, 2017 as they slept in their car after their home was destroyed by Hurricane Maria. The couple said they sold their car to build a room after FEMA rejected their request for financial help to rebuild their home, “It’s sad,” Rodriguez said. “So sad.” (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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Arden Dragoni holds a photo showing him with his family members in the remains of his destroyed home, which remains in shambles in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. The unemployed construction worker and security guard is currently separated as his wife and his children live in a FEMA subsidized apartment. “The hurricane brought us many calamities but my lesson was to value my family from my heart,” Dragoni said. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)
Updated on Jun 04, 2018 12:37 PM IST

Arden Dragoni holds a photo showing him with his family members in the remains of his destroyed home, which remains in shambles in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. The unemployed construction worker and security guard is currently separated as his wife and his children live in a FEMA subsidized apartment. “The hurricane brought us many calamities but my lesson was to value my family from my heart,” Dragoni said. (Ramon Espinosa / AP)

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