Photos: Evangelical pilgrims celebrate ‘Sukkot’, a Jewish festival in Jerusalem

Sukkot, or Feast of Tabernacles, is a seven day Jewish festival which began on October 4 this year. During the week-long period, people eat and sleep in temporary huts known as Sukkah. Thousands of Evangelical pilgrims from across the world travel to the holy city of Old Jerusalem to celebrate the festival.

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST 9 Photos
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An Ultra-Orthodox Jewish man carries palm branches for the roof of his Sukkah, a temporary hut constructed for use during the Jewish festival of Sukkot or the Feast of the Tabernacles in the neighbourhood of Mea Shearim, Jerusalem. Sukkot, a week-long holiday feast which began on October 4 is meant to commemorate the exodus of Jews from Egypt some 3200 years ago. (Menahem Kahana / AFP)

An Ultra-Orthodox Jewish man carries palm branches for the roof of his Sukkah, a temporary hut constructed for use during the Jewish festival of Sukkot or the Feast of the Tabernacles in the neighbourhood of Mea Shearim, Jerusalem. Sukkot, a week-long holiday feast which began on October 4 is meant to commemorate the exodus of Jews from Egypt some 3200 years ago. (Menahem Kahana / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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A general view shows Jewish worshippers taking part in the priestly blessing at the Western Wall of Judaism’s holiest prayer site in the Old City. Sukkot is agriculturally a harvest festival, also known as Chag Ha-Asif meaning the ‘festival of gathering.’ (Amir Cohen / REUTERS)

A general view shows Jewish worshippers taking part in the priestly blessing at the Western Wall of Judaism’s holiest prayer site in the Old City. Sukkot is agriculturally a harvest festival, also known as Chag Ha-Asif meaning the ‘festival of gathering.’ (Amir Cohen / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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A Jewish man lays palm branches on the roof of a temporary hut. During the period of the festival, people eat and sleep in these makeshift booths with the first day being Shabbat (rest day) in which work is forbidden. (Menahem Kahana / AFP)

A Jewish man lays palm branches on the roof of a temporary hut. During the period of the festival, people eat and sleep in these makeshift booths with the first day being Shabbat (rest day) in which work is forbidden. (Menahem Kahana / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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Children are seen playing at the plaza in front of their huts in Jerusalem. The Sukkah is a walled structure covered with plant material intended to evoke nostalgia of the type of dwelling in which the Israelites stayed during their 40 years of travel in the desert. (Menahem Kahana / AFP)

Children are seen playing at the plaza in front of their huts in Jerusalem. The Sukkah is a walled structure covered with plant material intended to evoke nostalgia of the type of dwelling in which the Israelites stayed during their 40 years of travel in the desert. (Menahem Kahana / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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A Jewish youth sells decorations for Sukkahs in the Jewish neighborhood of Mea Shearim, Jerusalem. Thousands of Evangelical Christian pilgrims from across the globe arrive at the holy city for prayers which in biblical times was marked by a pilgrimage to the Ein Gedi temple in Jerusalem. (Oded Balilty / AP)

A Jewish youth sells decorations for Sukkahs in the Jewish neighborhood of Mea Shearim, Jerusalem. Thousands of Evangelical Christian pilgrims from across the globe arrive at the holy city for prayers which in biblical times was marked by a pilgrimage to the Ein Gedi temple in Jerusalem. (Oded Balilty / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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Jewish worshippers touch the stones of the Western Wall in Jerusalem’s Old City. The holiday lasts for seven days in Israel while among Jewish diaspora, it lasts up to eight days - beginning and ending with a Sabbat. (Amir Cohen / REUTERS)

Jewish worshippers touch the stones of the Western Wall in Jerusalem’s Old City. The holiday lasts for seven days in Israel while among Jewish diaspora, it lasts up to eight days - beginning and ending with a Sabbat. (Amir Cohen / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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Samaritans walk up to pray on Mount Gerizim, near the city of Nablus, during the Sukkot festival. Samaritans are a community of a few hundred people living in Israel and in the Nablus area, who trace their lineage to the ancient Israelites Moses led out of Egypt. (Jaffar Ashtiyeh / AFP)

Samaritans walk up to pray on Mount Gerizim, near the city of Nablus, during the Sukkot festival. Samaritans are a community of a few hundred people living in Israel and in the Nablus area, who trace their lineage to the ancient Israelites Moses led out of Egypt. (Jaffar Ashtiyeh / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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Evangelical Christian pilgrims from Brazil attend a mass baptism ceremony in the waters of the Jordan River at Yardenit in northern Israel during the Jewish holiday. According to the gospel Jesus Christ was baptized in the water of the Jordan River by John the Baptist. (Menahem Kahana / AFP)

Evangelical Christian pilgrims from Brazil attend a mass baptism ceremony in the waters of the Jordan River at Yardenit in northern Israel during the Jewish holiday. According to the gospel Jesus Christ was baptized in the water of the Jordan River by John the Baptist. (Menahem Kahana / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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Samaritans are seen during the Sukkot festival. Evangelical Christianity is one of the fastest growing religious movements with belief in an era in the future when all nations of the earth will flock to Jerusalem. Jews and Christians both believe in such a Messianic age, though Jews do not accept the Christian belief that Jesus is the Messiah. (Jaffar Ashtiyeh / AFP)

Samaritans are seen during the Sukkot festival. Evangelical Christianity is one of the fastest growing religious movements with belief in an era in the future when all nations of the earth will flock to Jerusalem. Jews and Christians both believe in such a Messianic age, though Jews do not accept the Christian belief that Jesus is the Messiah. (Jaffar Ashtiyeh / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 10, 2017 09:54 AM IST
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