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Campus Connect: Experts in Pune welcome compact CBSE syllabus for Classes 1 to 12

While a majority of stakeholders are positive about the idea, there are others who pointed out the need to properly segregate the information.

pune Updated: Sep 14, 2018 17:01 IST
Ananya Barua
Ananya Barua
Hindustan Times, Pune
pune,maharashtra,cbse
Earlier in February 2018, the minister had declared that the reduction in the NCERT syllabus will be applicable in one to two years.(HT File Photo)

In an attempt to reduce academic pressure on school students, Prakash Javadekar, human resource development (HRD) minister, earlier this month made an announcement to reduce the existing syllabus for Classes 1 to 12 by 10 to 15 per cent.

While a majority of stakeholders are positive about the idea, there are others who pointed out the need to properly segregate the information. They also insisted that the school syllabus should be pertinent to the present times.

“This does seem to be a positive move, especially as more and more students are being pushed down by the arduous curriculum today. But, at the same time, it is crucial to make sure that the information that is being retained in the syllabus is of relevance. The world is always evolving and so the curriculum needs to be up-to-date with that,” said Jayshree Venkatraman, principal of SNBP International School, Rahatani.

Final touches

According to the minister, the central board is planning to cut down the syllabus by 10-15 % in the next academic year. Currently, the National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT) is working on the final touches in the curriculum rationalisation programme, which will eventually apply to all the schools affiliated to the Central Board of Secondary Education and the state boards that follow the NCERT syllabus. Earlier in February 2018, the minister had declared that the reduction in the NCERT syllabus will be applicable in one to two years.

“We have received more than one lakh suggestions...I hope this year (the new academic session) 10-15% of the syllabus will be reduced, and then next year further reduction can happen,” said Javadekar on September 5.

Responding to this, one of the Class 10 city toppers, Manali Malavade stated that while the reduction could be beneficial for higher class, it might not make much of a difference for the lower classes. “Currently I am in Class 11 in Delhi Public School, and at the cusp of pursuing my higher education in a year or so. I am glad if I can be one of the beneficiaries to this change in Class 12, but in the lower Classes, I feel most of the syllabus is pretty crisp.

“Lower classes are the building blocks and the comprehensive nature allows a student to find his or her way through the material and understand what he or she is best at. Also, for language subjects, too much of a trim might be harmful, as the competition outside the schools, is tough.”

Agreeing Venkatraman added, “A proper review into these books to eliminate only the irrelevant is crucial. I hope the important portions are not removed in the process.”

Balance is the key

‘’To prepare our children for the future, it is important to have a balance between academic rigour, emotional intelligence and creative and independent thinking. A rationalisation of the curriculum is welcome as it will allow more time for the schools to work on fostering creativity and the interpersonal skills of our students,” said Devyani Mungali, founder, Sanskriti School.

“The proposed reduction in syllabus is a welcome step as the current syllabus is vast and involves study of too many concepts in each grade. As a result, students quickly move on

from one concept to another, without any in-depth understanding. The curriculum rationalisation will not only make our educational programme robust, but also aid in bridging the gaps.

“It is essential to follow a hybrid of new innovative techniques and long-established formats of learning, thereby helping students build stronger concepts. It cultivates higher order thinking abilities and encourages young minds to focus on their critical thinking and problem-solving skills, equipping them to face today’s dynamic world,” said Sapna Agarwal, principal, Vibgyor High , Yerawada.

First Published: Sep 14, 2018 16:30 IST