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Cinema has no language: Samit Kakkad

Director Samit Kakkad is all set to make his Bollywood directorial debut with Ascharya F*#k It

regional-movies Updated: Apr 12, 2018 17:05 IST
Anjali Shetty
Anjali Shetty
Hindustan Times, Pune
Samit Kakkad’s next is his Bollywood directorial debut Ascharya F*#k It, which is inspired by Saadat Hasan Manto’s writings
Samit Kakkad’s next is his Bollywood directorial debut Ascharya F*#k It, which is inspired by Saadat Hasan Manto’s writings(HTPHOTO)
         

For film-maker Samit Kakkad, cinema is about transcending boundaries. The Half Ticket (2016) director believes that films are all about telling a story and are a reflection of society. So, there is no reason it should be divided by language or industry. Samit says, “For me, cinema has no language. It is all about making a film. As long as I have an exciting story to tell, I am not worried about the language or the medium. At the end of the day, it is about conviction and not being contrived. The film has to push envelopes.”

Samit’s next is his Bollywood directorial debut Ascharya F*#k It, which is inspired by Saadat Hasan Manto’s writings. It talks about desire and greed intertwining the lives of a Bollywood star, his chauffeur, a prostitute, and her pimp. Samit shares, “It is not an art film. It is inspired and based on true events. The cast and I met prostitutes and pimps to understand their lifestyle, body language and mannerisms, for the film. I wanted the team to get their reality right, and I don’t mind bringing out the naked truth.”

So, wasn’t he sceptical of taking up such a bold subject for his debut film in Bollywood? “Honestly, the audience today is evolved. They are open to different films and genres. Also, it is important to understand the inspiration behind this film. Manto once said, ‘Main chalta phirta Mumbai hun’. This film also reflects the ugly reality [of city life] through the lives of the characters in the film. I wanted to make a realistic film.”

Having worked in regional cinema, was it difficult to cope up with Bollywood standards? “I don’t really see the difference between industries, because at the end of the day, the camera is the same, the lenses are the same and so is the craft. As long as you know your technique and have a vision, the medium or the industry doesn’t matter.”

Samit adds, “Working with Yoodlee films was a liberating experience as I was given the scope to shoot exactly how I wanted in realistic situations and surroundings, with the kind of atmosphere and language I wanted, to make my characters seem real and engaging.”

First Published: Apr 12, 2018 16:58 IST

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