This art project uses the Khajuraho art style to comment on censorship | art and culture | Hindustan Times
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This art project uses the Khajuraho art style to comment on censorship

Being Censitive is a series of pop-up style art that allows the user to play censor and

art and culture Updated: Jul 16, 2016 15:18 IST
Antara Sengupta
Antara Sengupta
Hindustan Times
Pop up art

The breasts of three women can be blurred using movable card paper, to depict the censorship of ‘clothed cleavages’ on a popular TV channel.

Paper windows can be opened to reveal illustrated couples having sex — a comment on how 40 couples were booked for public indecency when cops barged into their private rooms at Madh Island hotels last year. The breasts of three stylised women can be blurred using movable card paper, to depict the censorship of ‘clothed cleavages’ on a popular TV channel.

An pop-up style art project juxtaposes Khajuraho paintings with modern-day censorship issues.

Modern-day issues of censorship are juxtaposed with erotic drawings from the Khajuraho temples in a pop-up art project by Akshita Chandra, 21, a design student in Bengaluru.

Read: Is kissing in public an obscene act?

Paper windows open to reveal couples having sex — a comment on how 40 couples were booked for public indecency when cops barged into their private rooms at Madh Island hotels last year.

The project, Being Censitive, consists of 28 pictures that explore censorship and sensitivity. “In India, censorship and moral policing is often the prerogative of those who have no business in the issue,” says Chandra.

So, a strip of paper that covers a couple’s private parts can be slid to reveal a biologically labelled diagram — for the request to ban sex education in schools.

Read: What lies beneath that moral policing?

“The illustrations use a mechanism similar to a pop-up book,” says Chandra, who started the project in August last year. “I had been thinking about moral policing or censorship for a while, and wanted to have a contemporary take on it,” she says.

Her next project, Grimm Reality, explores how fairytales such as Cindrella and Snow White, good-natured tales, show restrictive moral rules for girls.

Being Censitive will be exhibited at The Hive on Saturday, July 16. For more details, visit here.

What: Pop-up art on censorship in India

Where: Being Censitive