Lack of security, no health facilities at Ranjit Avenue hospital in Amritsar | punjab$amritsar | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Oct 24, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Lack of security, no health facilities at Ranjit Avenue hospital in Amritsar

Despite various incidents of theft and petty crimes in the area, the authorities have failed to provide a security guard to Bhai Dharam Singh Satellite Hospital at Ranjit Avenue.

punjab Updated: Aug 09, 2016 15:52 IST
Divya Sharma
No security guard deployed at Bhai Dharam Singh satellite hospital.
No security guard deployed at Bhai Dharam Singh satellite hospital.(Gurpreet Singh/HT Photo)

Despite various incidents of theft and petty crimes in the area, the authorities have failed to provide a security guard to Bhai Dharam Singh Satellite Hospital at Ranjit Avenue.

The hospital named after one of the Panj Pyaras was opened in 1999 to provide medical assistance to people residing in the area. The nurses and other employees tasked with taking care of the people, however, feel unsafe working here.

There have been cases of snatching reported at the hospital, and last year a door was stolen from its premises. Complaints to the higher authorities, however, have fell on deaf ears.

A nurse accompanied by a woman assistant and a woman Class-4 employee stays back to handle delivery cases at night. “There have been cases of snatching in this area. Sometimes men from the nearby slum try to enter the hospital under the influence of liquor. We have to remain alert all the time,” said Satinder Kaur Sandhu, a nurse.

Sanjeev, a pharmacist, said: “We have already told the authorities about the lack of security. We have been told there is no post of guard sanctioned. After the incidents of theft and snatching, they have promised to look into it.”

Medical officer Dr Kuldeep Kaur said: “Doctors have to change their shift for the evening OPD, and the nursing staff has to remain there throughout the night. There should be a security guard deputed here to protect the premises as well patients and woman staff.”

Security, however, is not among immediate priorities of health officials. Deputy medical commissioner Dr Prabhdeep Kaur Johal said: “We will be utilising the funds to procure computers and air conditioners, as in their absence the staff and patients are being inconvenienced. When the next allotment of funds is received, we will resolve the security issue.”

If threat posed by miscreants was not enough, snakes thriving in the wild growth around the hospital are also a cause of concern. “Earlier, we made an attempt to remove the wild growth, but it is back to square one. We need a gardener to handle the mess,” said Sanjeev, a pharmacist.

NO ULTRASOUND MACHINE

The satellite hospital mostly caters to pregnancy cases. However, it has not been provided with an ultrasound machine. “We do have a radiographer, but he is just checking X-ray reports. Cases needing an ultrasound are referred to the civil hospital,” said Satinder Kaur Sandhu.

Patients visiting the hospital, however, were satisfied with the facilities being provided by the staff. Raghav Arora, a resident of Majitha Road, said, “I came here with my wife for the delivery of our child. Initially, we were reluctant and thought of visiting a private hospital instead. But there is no dearth of facilities here.”