Indian army reaches out to Adityapur industries for procurements | ranchi | Hindustan Times
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Indian army reaches out to Adityapur industries for procurements

ranchi Updated: Feb 03, 2017 09:36 IST
B Vijay Murty
Army

Dignitaries attending the programme on “Army -Academia – Industry Interaction for Make in India “ in Jamshedpur on Thursday, (HT Photo)

The Indian army has opened out to the Indian industry to meet its day to day procurements, heading Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Make in India’ drive.

The army is holding special interactive sessions with the academia and the industry to propel the indigenous manufacturing sector and simultaneously make technological advancements to meet the future battlefield scenarios.

In one such endeavor, on Thursday, the deputy chief of army staff (planning and system), Lieutenant General Subrata Saha flew down to Jharkhand’s biggest industrial hub in Adityapur and addressed a select gathering of academia and industry on the premises of Ram Krishan Forging Limited, which is India’s second largest forging industry with five manufacturing plants across Jharkhand and Bengal.

General Saha apprised the gathering that there is a huge potential for the Indian industry to widely participate in army’s procurement and meet its present and future requirements.

“The Indian army’s strength is nearly 1.3 million. Hence the range, scope, width and depth of requirement from the industry are enormous. As part of our outreach programmes, we are travelling to the regional industrial hubs across the country conveying them on Indian army’s modernization requirements and together we are exploring the capabilities of developing everything indigenously,” he said.

Spread over 3500 acres of land, Adityapur is one of the largest and the oldest industrial belts of India. The average annual turnover of this industrial area is around Rs.3500 crore. A majority of companies here work in the sector of heavy machineries.

Speaking to HT, Saha said around 60% of the Indian army’s requirement were being imported.

“But as part of this whole Make in India exercise, we are targeting to drastically cut down the imports.”

Two brigadiers accompanying him detailed the audience on the requirements of various units of the Indian army, specially the infantry, armoury, artillery, air defense and signals and stressed on how joint ventures with the academia and industries can help acquire cutting edge technology to cope with the battlefield requirements indigenously.

RK Forging chairman MP Jalan convinced the army officials that given an opportunity the Adityapur industries can deliver unmatched products they require at any point of time. He said the Indian army is like an ocean and there is tremendous scope for the Indian industries to associate with them.

Army officials said they have already tied up with IIT Mumbai and IIT Gandhinagar to open defense technology centres to develop future core technologies. They said the army’s present policy is completely driven by Indianisation.