Clinton says Russia behind DNC hacking, questions Trump’s support of Putin

  • Reuters, Agency, Washington
  • Updated: Aug 01, 2016 14:28 IST
Demonstrators hold signs as they protest Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign event in Iowa. Democrat candidate Hillary Clinton has said Russia is an enemy and said it was responsible for the hacking of Democratic National Committee computers. (AFP Photo)

US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said on Sunday that Russian intelligence services hacked into Democratic National Committee (DNC) computers and questioned Republican rival Donald Trump’s overtures to Russian president Vladimir Putin.

“We know that Russian intelligence services hacked into the DNC and we know that they arranged for a lot of those emails to be released and we know that Donald Trump has shown a very troubling willingness to back up Putin, to support Putin,” Clinton said in an interview with Fox News Sunday.

The White House has declined to speculate on who was behind the hack of Democratic Party computers, referring to an ongoing investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Cybersecurity experts and US officials, however, said they believed Russia engineered the release of the emails to influence the November 8 presidential election.

Reuters reported that a computer network used by Clinton’s campaign was hacked as a part of the broad cyber attack on Democratic political organisations.

The United States would not tolerate that from any other country, especially one considered an adversary, Clinton said.

“For Trump to both encourage that and to praise Putin despite what appears to be a deliberate effort to try to affect the election I think raises national security issues,” she said.

Asked if she believed Putin wanted Trump in the White House, Clinton said she was not going to jump to that conclusion.

“But I think laying out the facts raises serious issues about Russian interference in our elections, in our democracy,” Clinton told Fox in the interview, taped on Saturday.

The Republican presidential nominee has praised Putin, saying he was a stronger leader than US president Barack Obama, a Democrat.

Trump last week invited Russia to dig up tens of thousands of “missing” emails from Clinton’s time at the US State Department. “Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing,” Trump told reporters.

He later said he was being “sarcastic” in his comments, which raised concerns among intelligence experts and criticism that Trump was urging a foreign government to spy on Americans.

Senator Jeff Sessions, a supporter of Trump, criticized Clinton for leaving her email system vulnerable to Russian penetration and defended Trump’s comments.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange refused to answer questions on Sunday about whether a foreign government leaked the DNC emails to the group. “It’s an interesting speculative question for the press,” he told NBC’s Meet the Press.

Trump alarmed allies this month when he indicated he might abandon NATO’s mutual defense guarantee in the face of potential Russian aggression if members had not paid their bills. He also suggested he would consider easing sanctions on Russia and recognizing its annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region.

On Sunday, Trump referred to that annexation again in a way that appeared to justify it. “The people of Crimea, from what I’ve heard, would rather be with Russia than where they were,” he said on ABC’s This Week.

He also said Putin was “not going to go into Ukraine,” prompting a rebuke from Clinton adviser Jake Sullivan.

“Russia is already in Ukraine. Does he not know that?” Sullivan said in a statement.

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