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Tuesday, Aug 20, 2019

CelebsPick: 5 books that should be movies!

Film-makers choose their favourites books for screen adaptations

brunch Updated: Jul 27, 2019 21:01 IST
Ananya Ghosh
Ananya Ghosh
Hindustan Times
Five stories from books that will look great on screen
Five stories from books that will look great on screen
         

The Other Side of Silence: Voices from the Partition of India By Urvashi Butalia 

Hindustantimes

“I am currently reading this book and I’m really thinking of asking for its movie rights. It talks about the Partition from women’s perspective. Usually we see history from the man’s perspective. Even the horrors faced by women are documented by men.” —Onir

The Romantics By Pankaj Mishra

Hindustantimes

“I absolutely love this book and I love the world the book provides a glimpse into. It’s such a beautifully told coming-of-age story. I would also like to adapt Deepti Kapoor’s A Bad Character. Kapoor’s debut novel is a beautiful and dark story of a young woman in Delhi. It’s totally my kind of story.” —Alankrita Shrivastava

The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul By Deborah Rodriguez

Hindustantimes

“I recently read this book and instantly wished I could adapt it for the screen. It’s about a small coffee shop and five women who meet there. I know it’s a long shot but I am naturally drawn to human stories based in the Middle East!” —Akarsh Khurana

Kafka On the Shore By Haruki Murakami

Hindustantimes

“Most books should ideally be left untouched because what you feel and visualise while reading disappoints when you see the world in movies. But having said that, Haruki Murakami’s Kafka On the Shore, can be a great one for film festivals.” —Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari

The Mill on the Floss By George Eliot

Hindustantimes

“George Eliot, the fierce writer of this book, used a pen name in the Victorian era possibly because she didn’t want people to expect fluffy romances from her! The passionate, intelligent, sensitive and deeply loving Maggie Tulliver is a heroine I greatly admire and I would love to see a film based on this book directed by an equally fierce and modern director like Cary Fukunaga, whose Jane Eyre was wonderful.” —Tanuja Chandra

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From HT Brunch, July 28, 2019

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First Published: Jul 27, 2019 20:54 IST

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