Study links exposure to environmental chemicals with autistic behaviour in kids | Health - Hindustan Times
close_game
close_game

Study links exposure to environmental chemicals with autistic behaviour in kids

ANI |
Mar 30, 2021 08:21 AM IST

A new study reveals that increased exposure to selected environmental toxicants like metals, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phthalates, and bisphenol-A (BPA) impacts brain development during pregnancy and leads to autistic-like behaviours in children

A novel study found correlations between increased expressions of autistic-like behaviours in pre-school aged children to gestational exposure to selected environmental toxicants, including metals, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phthalates, and bisphenol-A (BPA).

Study links exposure to environmental chemicals with autistic behaviour in kids(Twitter/adopt_matters)
Study links exposure to environmental chemicals with autistic behaviour in kids(Twitter/adopt_matters)

The study led by Simon Fraser University's Faculty of Health Sciences researchers was published today in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Unlock exclusive access to the latest news on India's general elections, only on the HT App. Download Now! Download Now!

This population study measured the levels of 25 chemicals in blood and urine samples collected from 1,861 Canadian women during the first trimester of pregnancy. A follow-up survey was conducted with 478 participants, using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) tool for assessing autistic-like behaviours in pre-school children.

The researchers found that higher maternal concentrations of cadmium, lead, and some phthalates in blood or urine samples was associated with increased SRS scores, and these associations were particularly strong among children with a higher degree of autistic-like behaviours. Interestingly, the study also noted that increased maternal concentrations of manganese, trans-Nonachlor, many organophosphate pesticide metabolites, and mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP) were most strongly associated with lower SRS scores.

The study's lead author, Josh Alampi, notes that this study primarily "highlights the relationships between select environmental toxicants and increased SRS scores. Further studies are needed to fully assess the links and impacts of these environmental chemicals on brain development during pregnancy."

The results were achieved by using a statistical analysis tool, called Bayesian quantile regression, which allowed investigators to determine which individual toxicants were associated with increased SRS scores in a more nuanced way than conventional methods.

"The relationships we discovered between these toxicants and SRS scores would not have been detected through the use of a means-based method of statistical analysis (such as linear regression)," noted Alampi. "Although quantile regression is not frequently used by investigators, it can be a powerful way to analyze complex population-based data."

Follow more stories on Facebook and Twitter

Catch every big hit, every wicket with Crick-it, a one stop destination for Live Scores, Match Stats, Quizzes, Polls & much more. Explore now!.

Catch your daily dose of Fashion, Taylor Swift, Health, Festivals, Travel, Relationship, Recipe and all the other Latest Lifestyle News on Hindustan Times Website and APPs.
This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.
SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Share this article
SHARE
Story Saved
Live Score
OPEN APP
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Tuesday, May 21, 2024
Start 14 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now
Follow Us On