Photos: Boko Haram displaced feel neglected amid Nigeria election fever

Ahead of Nigeria’s general elections that are scheduled for tomorrow, the internally displaced people at a camp in Malkohi village, near the Adamawa state capital Yola, feel forgotten. Living under deplorable conditions, the people fled from the Borno state town of Gwoza which was under attack by the terrorist group Boko Haram. As the two main presidential candidates make promises to end this terror, the refugees hope to return to their homes, and eventually, to their former lives.

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST 8 Photos
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A man rides a bicycle inside a refugee camp in Jimeta, Adamawa State, Nigeria, ahead of the country's general elections set for February 23 after a last-minute rescheduling. Malkohi is a camp for internally displaced people who fled their homes as Boko Haram insurgents advanced across north-eastern Nigeria. From their homes on the outskirts of Yola, capital of presidential candidate Atiku Abubakar's home state Adamawa, Malkohi residents say they feel forgotten. (Luis Tato / AFP)

A man rides a bicycle inside a refugee camp in Jimeta, Adamawa State, Nigeria, ahead of the country's general elections set for February 23 after a last-minute rescheduling. Malkohi is a camp for internally displaced people who fled their homes as Boko Haram insurgents advanced across north-eastern Nigeria. From their homes on the outskirts of Yola, capital of presidential candidate Atiku Abubakar's home state Adamawa, Malkohi residents say they feel forgotten. (Luis Tato / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST
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Camp dwellers pump water from a well at Malkohi refugee camp in Jimeta, Adamawa State, Nigeria. About 2,800 people have been displaced to the camp in Malkohi village from the Borno state town of Gwoza, which the insurgents sacked in 2014. More than 27,000 people have been killed since the Boko Haram conflict began in 2009 and some 1.8 million others are still displaced. (Luis Tato / AFP)

Camp dwellers pump water from a well at Malkohi refugee camp in Jimeta, Adamawa State, Nigeria. About 2,800 people have been displaced to the camp in Malkohi village from the Borno state town of Gwoza, which the insurgents sacked in 2014. More than 27,000 people have been killed since the Boko Haram conflict began in 2009 and some 1.8 million others are still displaced. (Luis Tato / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST
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A woman selling food waits for costumers at the camp. President Muhammadu Buhari came to power in 2015 on a pledge to end the insurgency, which at its peak saw the Islamists control an area the size of Belgium. The residents of Malkohi say they’re ready to support Buhari at Saturday’s rescheduled vote -- even if they can’t return to Gwoza to do so. (Luis Tato / AFP)

A woman selling food waits for costumers at the camp. President Muhammadu Buhari came to power in 2015 on a pledge to end the insurgency, which at its peak saw the Islamists control an area the size of Belgium. The residents of Malkohi say they’re ready to support Buhari at Saturday’s rescheduled vote -- even if they can’t return to Gwoza to do so. (Luis Tato / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST
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A group of girls walk on their way to school at the camp. Shortly after taking office, Buhari declared Boko Haram “technically defeated”, apparently fulfilling the promise that was seen as a key to his victory. But in February last year, the group seized 110 schoolgirls from Dapchi, in an echo of the 2014 abduction of more than 200 from Chibok that brought world attention to the conflict. (Luis Tato / AFP)

A group of girls walk on their way to school at the camp. Shortly after taking office, Buhari declared Boko Haram “technically defeated”, apparently fulfilling the promise that was seen as a key to his victory. But in February last year, the group seized 110 schoolgirls from Dapchi, in an echo of the 2014 abduction of more than 200 from Chibok that brought world attention to the conflict. (Luis Tato / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST
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Two girls play while riding a bicycle at the camp. An Islamic State-allied faction has in recent months overrun military bases, seizing equipment and weapons, and forcing tens of thousands of people to flee for their lives. Nigeria’s election commission has been forced to set up special measures for them to vote: in Borno, some 4,00,000 displaced people will vote at 10 centres. Several others have been created in Adamawa. (Luis Tato / AFP)

Two girls play while riding a bicycle at the camp. An Islamic State-allied faction has in recent months overrun military bases, seizing equipment and weapons, and forcing tens of thousands of people to flee for their lives. Nigeria’s election commission has been forced to set up special measures for them to vote: in Borno, some 4,00,000 displaced people will vote at 10 centres. Several others have been created in Adamawa. (Luis Tato / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST
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A woman cooks inside her home at the camp. The makeshift homes are constructed from tarpaulin donated by aid agencies who also built a water tower for the settlement. (Luis Tato / AFP)

A woman cooks inside her home at the camp. The makeshift homes are constructed from tarpaulin donated by aid agencies who also built a water tower for the settlement. (Luis Tato / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST
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A man carries his son on a bicycle at the camp. The main opposition candidate, Atiku Abubakar, has seized on the insecurity and claimed Buhari has failed in his core duty of keeping Nigerians safe. (Luis Tato / AFP)

A man carries his son on a bicycle at the camp. The main opposition candidate, Atiku Abubakar, has seized on the insecurity and claimed Buhari has failed in his core duty of keeping Nigerians safe. (Luis Tato / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST
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Two men carry firewood in bicycles while on their way home at the camp. From their homes in Adamawa -- Abubakar’s home state -- Malkohi residents say they feel more forgotten than under attack. “Up to now, hospitals have not been provided. Before, [aid groups] gave us drugs, but now we don’t receive any,” said Fanta Ali, a housewife at the camp. (Luis Tato / AFP)

Two men carry firewood in bicycles while on their way home at the camp. From their homes in Adamawa -- Abubakar’s home state -- Malkohi residents say they feel more forgotten than under attack. “Up to now, hospitals have not been provided. Before, [aid groups] gave us drugs, but now we don’t receive any,” said Fanta Ali, a housewife at the camp. (Luis Tato / AFP)

UPDATED ON FEB 22, 2019 07:02 PM IST
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