Photos: Staycations in South Korea to beat the pandemic blues

The World Bank believes that South Koreans are among the top investors in global tourism and while the pandemic might have spoiled their travels plans, some of them are indulging into recreating outdoor experiences at home to beat away the pandemic blues. Che Min-hee and her husband Lee Seung-yoon had travel plans to New York this summer; instead they have converted their Seoul apartment into an outdoor camping site by installing a portable stove, folding chairs, picnic-ware and at least 15 different types of twinkling lanterns for a safe stayacation.

UPDATED ON AUG 26, 2020 07:00 PM IST 7 Photos
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Lee Seung-yoon cooks during a staycation at his family’s home amid the coronavirus outbreak, in Seoul on August 22. While the pandemic may have brought travel to a halt, Seung-yoon’s family has improvised on their summer holiday plans and brought home a staycation. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

Lee Seung-yoon cooks during a staycation at his family’s home amid the coronavirus outbreak, in Seoul on August 22. While the pandemic may have brought travel to a halt, Seung-yoon’s family has improvised on their summer holiday plans and brought home a staycation. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 26, 2020 07:00 PM IST
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Seung-yoon, his wife Che Min-hee and their son Lee Ji-sung set up camping gear at their home in Seoul on August 22. The couple has turned their Seoul flat into an indoor camping site in order to recreate a beach or woods getaway which is a popular vacation idea among the South Koreans. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

Seung-yoon, his wife Che Min-hee and their son Lee Ji-sung set up camping gear at their home in Seoul on August 22. The couple has turned their Seoul flat into an indoor camping site in order to recreate a beach or woods getaway which is a popular vacation idea among the South Koreans. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 26, 2020 07:00 PM IST
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Various types of lamps are seen on a table to recreate the outdoor camping effect in Seoul on August 22. The family has spent their travel money on camping gear including portable stove, folding chairs, picnic-ware and at least 15 different types of twinkling lanterns which cost them around 10 million won ($8,405). (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

Various types of lamps are seen on a table to recreate the outdoor camping effect in Seoul on August 22. The family has spent their travel money on camping gear including portable stove, folding chairs, picnic-ware and at least 15 different types of twinkling lanterns which cost them around 10 million won ($8,405). (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 26, 2020 07:00 PM IST
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Lee Seung-yoon lights a lamp during his staycation in Seoul. To enhance the outdoor experience Seung-yoon added a crackling campfire video stream on the television which furthered the “atmosphere of authenticity.” (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

Lee Seung-yoon lights a lamp during his staycation in Seoul. To enhance the outdoor experience Seung-yoon added a crackling campfire video stream on the television which furthered the “atmosphere of authenticity.” (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 26, 2020 07:00 PM IST
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Lee Seung-yoon cooks on a portable stove inside his house in Seoul. According to Reuters, the family is now on their second weekend home-camping trip. On August 22, they cooked gambas al ajillo, a Spanish garlic shrimp dish, and pasta on a portable stove while it rained outside. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

Lee Seung-yoon cooks on a portable stove inside his house in Seoul. According to Reuters, the family is now on their second weekend home-camping trip. On August 22, they cooked gambas al ajillo, a Spanish garlic shrimp dish, and pasta on a portable stove while it rained outside. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 26, 2020 07:00 PM IST
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The family interacts with each other during their staycation in Seoul on August 22. As South Korean government has called on the people to stay indoors and avoid any unnecessary trips, the sales of camping equipment from April to mid-July has jumped 51.6%, Reuters reported quoting South Korea’s retail giant E-Mart Inc.’s numbers. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

The family interacts with each other during their staycation in Seoul on August 22. As South Korean government has called on the people to stay indoors and avoid any unnecessary trips, the sales of camping equipment from April to mid-July has jumped 51.6%, Reuters reported quoting South Korea’s retail giant E-Mart Inc.’s numbers. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 26, 2020 07:00 PM IST
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A combination of pictures show the before and after setup of a staycation camp at their home in Seoul on August 22. According to Reuters, Che and Lee had to wait two to three months to purchase their tents, folding table and stove, as South Koreans, normally among the top ten spenders on tourism globally according to the World Bank, splurged on equipment to make up for missed overseas trips. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

A combination of pictures show the before and after setup of a staycation camp at their home in Seoul on August 22. According to Reuters, Che and Lee had to wait two to three months to purchase their tents, folding table and stove, as South Koreans, normally among the top ten spenders on tourism globally according to the World Bank, splurged on equipment to make up for missed overseas trips. (Kim Hong-Ji / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON AUG 26, 2020 07:00 PM IST
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