A wounded protester is carried during a protest against the military coup in Mandalay, Myanmar, Sunday.(AP)
A wounded protester is carried during a protest against the military coup in Mandalay, Myanmar, Sunday.(AP)

Myanmar’s deadliest day since military coup leaves at least 18 dead

The deaths came after soldiers and police officers fired live ammunition into crowds in six cities across Myanmar, UN Human Rights Office spokesperson Ravina Shamdasani said.
Bloomberg | | Posted by Kunal Gaurav
PUBLISHED ON FEB 28, 2021 07:58 PM IST

Myanmar saw its deadliest day since the Feb. 1 coup, with the United Nations saying authorities killed at least 18 protesters in a stark escalation of violence to quell persistent demonstrations against military rule.

The deaths came after soldiers and police officers fired live ammunition into crowds in six cities across Myanmar, which also left more than 30 people wounded, UN Human Rights Office Spokesperson Ravina Shamdasani said in a statement on Sunday. Myanmar’s government said 12 people died.

“We strongly condemn the escalating violence against protests in Myanmar and call on the military to immediately halt the use of force against peaceful protesters,” Shamdasani said.

The rising death toll may increase pressure on governments around the world to take more action against Myanmar’s generals, who refused to recognize a landslide election victory by Aung San Suu Kyi’s political party in November. The Biden administration has announced sanctions targeting the country’s military leaders, while urging a return to democracy.

“In shooting against unarmed citizens, the security forces have shown a blatant disregard for international law, and must be held to account,” said Josep Borrell, the EU’s high representative for foreign affairs. “Violence will not give legitimacy to the illegal over-throwing of the democratically-elected government.”

Prior to this weekend, only three protesters had died among hundreds of thousands that have protested almost daily across the country. Yet the country has become increasingly ungovernable as more people join the protest movement, leaving hospitals understaffed, containers stacking up at ports and bank ATMs running out of cash.

The Myanmar Police Force announced Sunday night that 571 protesters had been detained in 11 provinces.

On Saturday, the junta fired Kyaw Moe Tun, Myanmar’s permanent representative to the UN, after he urged the international community not to accept the military regime and instead recognize the results of the November general election.

“He failed to follow the state’s orders and instructions, committed treason, showed his loyalty” to the parliamentary committee led by Suu Kyi’s party, and “misused his authoritative powers as an ambassador of Myanmar,” the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a statement on Saturday.

Southeast Asian foreign ministers are making arrangements to meet this week to discuss the situation, Japan’s Kyodo news agency reported on Saturday. Most members of the 10-nation group have expressed a willingness to join, and the military-appointed foreign minister of Myanmar, an Asean member, has been asked to participate, according to Kyodo. Calls to Myanmar’s foreign ministry for comments on the meeting were unanswered.

Riot police arrested five journalists across the country on Saturday for reporting on anti-coup protests, according to Myanmar Journalists Network. One of them is reported to be a photojournalist with the Associated Press, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, a rights group.

“The Myanmar security forces’ clear escalation in use of lethal force in multiple towns and cities across the country in response to mostly peaceful anti-coup protesters is outrageous and unacceptable, and must be immediately halted,” said Phil Robertson, Deputy Asia Director of Human Rights Watch. “Live ammunition should not be used to control or disperse protests and lethal force can only be used to protect life or prevent serious injury.”

The National League for Democracy plans to put together a parallel government that could engage with the international community, the Financial Times reported, citing a party official who is on the run.

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