View from space: Watch ISRO’s launch of 104 satellites into the sky and beyond | india-news | Hindustan Times
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View from space: Watch ISRO’s launch of 104 satellites into the sky and beyond

india Updated: Feb 16, 2017 15:03 IST
HT Correspondent
ISRO

A screenshot from the video taken by the cameras fitted on the PSLV . (Screengrab/ isro.gov.in)

High-resolution cameras fitted on the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) clicked selfie videos of the space mission as Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) set a new record by successfully launching 104 satellites in one go on Wednesday.

The main payload of the Wednesday’s PSLV rocket was India’s Cartosat 2D, a high-resolution earth observation satellite, and two nano satellites, INS-1A and INS-1B. Data from India’s Cartosat-2 will help inform land-use maps, water resource mapping and road network monitoring.

Piggybacking on the launch were the remaining 101 foreign satellites from six countries: the US, Israel, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and new customers UAE and Kazakhstan.

Read| PSLV can launch even 400 nano satellites: Former ISRO chairman

PSLV first launched the 714 kg Cartosat-2 Series satellite, followed by the INS-1A and INS-1B, after it reached the polar Sun Synchronous Orbit. It then went on to inject the rest of the passenger satellites, together weighing about 664 kg, in pairs.

Cheering scientists at Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh received a selfie of the American “Dove” satellites amid the blue and white clouds of the earth.

ISRO has emerged as the world’s most successful satellite launching centre, putting more satellites in space from other countries than any other station.

Read| ISRO’s achievements remarkable but it must tame ‘naughty boy’ GSLV

It puts a wide margin between it and the next record holder, the Russian Space Agency that launched 37 satellites in 2014. Earlier, the US space agency Nasa launched 29, while ISRO successfully launched 20 satellites in one go in June 2015.

Watch the video, here