The Indian cricket team that won the 2002 Natwest Trophy under Sourav Ganguly.(Getty Images)
The Indian cricket team that won the 2002 Natwest Trophy under Sourav Ganguly.(Getty Images)

When Virender Sehwag taught Sourav Ganguly a key lesson in captaincy during 2002 Natwest final

Sourav Ganguly credited Virender Sehwag for teaching him a lesson in man-management during the memorable 2002 Natwest final.
UPDATED ON APR 04, 2021 02:01 PM IST

Former India captain Sourav Ganguly recalled the 2002 final against England during which opener Virender Sehwag taught him an important lesson in captaincy. India had a mammoth task of 326 to chase to win the trophy, and despite openers Ganguly and Sehwag giving a solid start to the team, India lost quick wickets in the middle overs.

Yuvraj Singh and Mohammad Kaif went on to stitch a match-winning partnership and eventually helped the team in scripting a historic win.

Also read: 'We're not like other teams, we don't show off or brag': Sunrisers batsman highlights his team's biggest strength

But Ganguly credited Sehwag for teaching him a lesson in man-management during the memorable final.

"We were chasing 325 in that final. When we walked out to open, I was very disappointed and disturbed but Sehwag said we will win. We had a good start (82 in 12 overs) and I told him that since we had seen off the new ball bowlers, he should not lose his wicket and focus on singles," Ganguly said in a Youtube video titled 'Extra Class with Sourav Ganguly' posted on ClassPlus official channel.

“But when Ronnie Irani came in to bowl his first over, and Sehwag smashed a four off the first ball. I walked up to him and said we have a boundary, now let us take singles. But he didn’t listen and hit a four off the second ball too. He hit a four off the third ball too.

"I was very angry. Then he hit one off the fifth ball too,” Ganguly said and added that he soon realized there is no point in stopping Sehwag since his natural game is aggressive.

“I realized there is no point in stopping him since his natural style of play is aggressive," Ganguly explained.

He further went on to add that "a captain needs to adjust himself to a player's thinking."

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