BOOK OF THE WEEK: In Search of the Prophet | india | Hindustan Times
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BOOK OF THE WEEK: In Search of the Prophet

The authors take us on a journey with the protagonist, the 14-year-old orphan Salek, to find all about the Prophet Muhammad.

india Updated: Mar 11, 2006 13:09 IST

In Search of the Prophet
Shahrukh Husain and Samira Shackle
Price — Rs 160
Publication — Puffin Books

We live in an age of stress where religion is at times reflected as a monster in the distorted mirror of the society. When such is the time, Shahrukh Husain and Samira Shackle’s In Search of the Prophet makes a brave attempt of reclaiming Islam from the fundamentalists, running it through the sieve of the Prophet’s divine message and thus reinstating Islam’s original glory and dignity.

The authors take us on a journey with the protagonist, the 14-year-old orphan Salek, to find all about the Prophet Muhammad. The grandfather’s abode of wealth ceased to interest Salek and he felt increasingly drawn towards the beckoning call of love and wisdom.

He inherited these fascinating parchments filled with tales of wonder, tales of magic, tales of learning, glorious battles and most of all triumph in suffering all from his poet-father whose sole obsession was to research about the Prophet’s life. Husain and Shackle spin a compelling web of words and like Salek, the readers are also drawn into this world of words which chronicles the life of the prophet.

The incidents of the Prophet’s birth and upbringing, his preachings, of battles fought and divine wisdom all are narrated through the voice of Salek who renounces the world of satin and gold in search of the messiah. Some of the high points of the book are its lilting language and the good old art of storytelling with a refreshed look at tales of yore.

In the din of contemporary times, the sound and fury of religion hides its message of peace and love. Every religion makes an attempt to percolate its essence even to the level of children like Christian, Hindu, Buddhist religious texts have done.

This books fills that void for an Islamic religious text and does it wonderfully well not only for the kids but also for the adults whose visions are coloured by the hegemony of ‘Bush’ men!