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Tom Hanks' Oscar Do's and Dont's

Oscar nominees, who may be in a fix about preparing their acceptance speeches, can now look to Tom Hanks for help. The Academy has brought out an eight-minute instructional

india Updated: Mar 03, 2006 19:28 IST
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Oscar nominees, who may be in a fix about preparing their acceptance speeches, can now look to Tom Hanks for help. The Academy has brought out an eight-minute instructional video, narrated by Hanks, about the do's and don'ts while accepting an award.

Entitled An Insider's Guide: What Nominees Need To Know, the video includes clips of Oscar moments that stuck in the memory, such as Jack Palance doing one-arm push-ups, or Roberto Benigni gliding over the tops of everyone's chairs en route to the stage or Gwyneth Paltrow's deluge of tears, reports The Independent.

Rule 1: Hanks says, is to manage the triumphal approach to the stage and the speech in no more than 60 seconds. "Instead of hugging everyone within a 10-row radius, you might have to settle for a few fast high-fives as you sprint down the aisle," he says.

Rule 2: if there are multiple winners, let one person speak on behalf of everyone. (Subtext: since you're just costume designers or producers, nobody cares about you and you probably aren't that good- looking anyway, so do hurry up.)

Rule 3: "Lose the list." The Academy now allows winners to post their thank-yous in full on its website, a bit like the trend in footnotes in academic publishing.

No need to weigh everybody down with it when your lawyer's obnoxiously hard-charging negotiation over your profit participation deal is of no concern to the great unwashed.

Hanks' most valuable tip: "Maximise your moment." This is a smart way of encouraging people to be interesting and entertaining, without falling into the trap the Academy has set for itself in previous years, when it has implied that what it really wants to avoid is controversy or any hint of spontaneity.