Photos: Silicosis leaves Rajasthan miners gasping for breath

An affidavit filed in the Supreme Court this year by the Centre suggests over 1.4 lakh miners in Rajasthan could be afflicted by silicosis, a life threatening occupational hazard.

Updated On Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST 8 Photos
Copy Link
1 / 8
Over 2.3 lakh miners across mining sites in India live with the risk of contracting silicosis, a respiratory impairment caused by the inhalation of fine silica particles in dust that rises during mining processes. Despite regulations in place, making suppression of airborne dust binding upon mine operators, workers in Rajasthan are at greater risk of this life-threatening disease. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Over 2.3 lakh miners across mining sites in India live with the risk of contracting silicosis, a respiratory impairment caused by the inhalation of fine silica particles in dust that rises during mining processes. Despite regulations in place, making suppression of airborne dust binding upon mine operators, workers in Rajasthan are at greater risk of this life-threatening disease. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST
Copy Link
2 / 8
Widows of miners who succumbed to silicosis seen at a mining settlement near Jodhpur, Rajasthan. 5307 workers in Rajasthan were diagnosed with silicosis in the last four years. Rajasthan saw 323 casualties to the disease last year among workers at quarries. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Widows of miners who succumbed to silicosis seen at a mining settlement near Jodhpur, Rajasthan. 5307 workers in Rajasthan were diagnosed with silicosis in the last four years. Rajasthan saw 323 casualties to the disease last year among workers at quarries. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST
Copy Link
3 / 8
The hands of a mine worker are covered with fine dust. According to an affidavit filed in the Supreme Court this year by the Centre, over 1.4 lakh people work in Rajasthan’s mines and all could be afflicted by the lung disease. Despite being one of the oldest known occupational hazards, cases of silicosis are often miscounted as tuberculosis as silicosis primarily renders the respiratory system vulnerable to other terminal diseases. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

The hands of a mine worker are covered with fine dust. According to an affidavit filed in the Supreme Court this year by the Centre, over 1.4 lakh people work in Rajasthan’s mines and all could be afflicted by the lung disease. Despite being one of the oldest known occupational hazards, cases of silicosis are often miscounted as tuberculosis as silicosis primarily renders the respiratory system vulnerable to other terminal diseases. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST
Copy Link
4 / 8
Mine workers show their Silicosis Certificates in Rajasthan, India. The Employee’s Compensation Act, 1923 recognises the risk of silicosis as an occupational hazard, mandating compensation for afflicted workers. Despite an amended law passed by Lok Sabha last year, workers struggle for compensation, saddled with the onus of diagnosis and then proving links to an occupational hazard. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Mine workers show their Silicosis Certificates in Rajasthan, India. The Employee’s Compensation Act, 1923 recognises the risk of silicosis as an occupational hazard, mandating compensation for afflicted workers. Despite an amended law passed by Lok Sabha last year, workers struggle for compensation, saddled with the onus of diagnosis and then proving links to an occupational hazard. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST
Copy Link
5 / 8
A majority of mines operate using dry mining that generates a large amount of residual dust. This is compounded by a lack of protective gear for miners exposing them to inhalation of fine silica particles. A shift towards wet mining which reduces the amount of dust is a relatively cost efficient means of curbing the hazard of silicosis --so far a disease with no known cure. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

A majority of mines operate using dry mining that generates a large amount of residual dust. This is compounded by a lack of protective gear for miners exposing them to inhalation of fine silica particles. A shift towards wet mining which reduces the amount of dust is a relatively cost efficient means of curbing the hazard of silicosis --so far a disease with no known cure. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST
Copy Link
6 / 8
41 year old Om Prakash, a silicosis patient due to mine work in Jodhpur District, Rajasthan. The state government announced ₹1 lakh relief for every worker diagnosed with silicosis by health boards and ₹3 lakh to the families of those who die after diagnosis, but has failed to penalise employers who do not abide by these directives. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

41 year old Om Prakash, a silicosis patient due to mine work in Jodhpur District, Rajasthan. The state government announced ₹1 lakh relief for every worker diagnosed with silicosis by health boards and ₹3 lakh to the families of those who die after diagnosis, but has failed to penalise employers who do not abide by these directives. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST
Copy Link
7 / 8
Miners continue to risk silicosis despite regulations and penalties drawn out for its prevention. While the responsibility of compensating diagnosed miners falls on mine operators, media reports highlight that relief is provided by the state government on the orders of the State Human Rights Commission stemming from infringements on the miners’ right to life. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Miners continue to risk silicosis despite regulations and penalties drawn out for its prevention. While the responsibility of compensating diagnosed miners falls on mine operators, media reports highlight that relief is provided by the state government on the orders of the State Human Rights Commission stemming from infringements on the miners’ right to life. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST
Copy Link
8 / 8
While the miners themselves are aware of the rampant casualties in the mining community, economic backwardness and negligible land holdings continue to force people to take to this risky occupation for want of other livelihood options that can generate sustained periods of employment across the year. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

While the miners themselves are aware of the rampant casualties in the mining community, economic backwardness and negligible land holdings continue to force people to take to this risky occupation for want of other livelihood options that can generate sustained periods of employment across the year. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 29, 2017 01:21 PM IST
Copy Link
SHARE
Story Saved
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Friday, January 21, 2022