Photos: Haitian migrants' struggle amid America’s deportation calls

Nearly all Haitians reach the US border on a well-worn route: Fly to Brazil, Chile or elsewhere in South America.

Published on Sep 21, 2021 05:11 PM IST 8 Photos
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A Haitian migrant carries a child while wading across the Rio Grande from Del Rio, Texas, to return to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, on Sept. 19. Of the roughly 1.8 million Haitians living outside their homeland, the United States is home to the largest Haitian immigrant population in the world, numbering 705,000 people from the Western Hemisphere's poorest country, AP reported.(Felix Marquez / AP)

Published on Sep 21, 2021 05:11 PM IST
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Migrants, many from Haiti, attempt to cross the Rio Grande from Del Rio, Texas, to return to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, on September 19. Many Haitians began attempting to enter the US in the 1980s by sea. Most of them were cut off by the Coast Guard and perhaps given a cursory screening for asylum eligibility, David FitgGerald, a sociology professor at the University of California, San Diego told AP.(Felix Marquez / AP)

Published on Sep 21, 2021 05:11 PM IST
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Haitian men struggle with Mexican immigration officials after being detained in Ciudad Acuna, Coahuila state, Mexico, on September 20. Tens of thousands of Haitians fled after a devastating earthquake in 2010 to settle in South America. After jobs dried up from the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro in 2016, many came to Tijuana. President Barack Obama initially allowed them in the US on humanitarian grounds but abruptly began flying them back to Haiti, leaving many stranded on the Mexican border.(Paul Ratje / AFP)

Published on Sep 21, 2021 05:11 PM IST
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Pierre Charles (C), a Haitian deported from the US shares a motorcycle taxi with a fellow deportee, after leaving the Toussaint Louverture International Airport, in Port au Prince, Haiti, on September 20. Many Haitians have established at least temporary legal status in Mexico, Brazil and elsewhere. Some have spouses or children from their adopted countries.(Rodrigo Abd / AP)

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Mexican army soldiers patrol the street in Ciudad Acuña, on September 20. Over the years Haitians have found work at border factories built for US exports and at car washes. One hardscrabble neighbourhood is now known as “Little Haiti" because so many settled there.(Felix Marquez / AP)

Published on Sep 21, 2021 05:11 PM IST
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A woman carries a child away from the Rio Grande river after crossing it from Del Rio, Texas, to return to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, on September 20. Unlike Central Americans, Haitians have generally not been deported from Mexico. So far this year, 19,000 have requested asylum in Mexico, a figure second only to Hondurans. In the previous two years, only about 6,000 Haitians had applied each year.(Felix Marquez / AP)

Published on Sep 21, 2021 05:11 PM IST
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Haitian migrants continue to cross across the US-Mexico border on the Rio Grande as seen from Ciudad Acuna, Coahuila state, Mexico on September 20. The Biden administration plans to ramp up this week to seven flights a day in what may be the swiftest, large-scale American efforts to remove migrants or refugees in decades.(Paul Ratje / AFP)

Published on Sep 21, 2021 05:11 PM IST
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A Haitian migrant swims across the Rio Grande river from Del Rio, Texas, to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, late on September 19 to avoid deportation to Haiti from the US. (Felix Marquez / AP)

Published on Sep 21, 2021 05:11 PM IST