Heramb MakerLab in Pune helps youth experiment with 3-D printing | pune news | Hindustan Times
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Heramb MakerLab in Pune helps youth experiment with 3-D printing

The newly launched 2-month old lab, now flaunts gadgets like the 3D printer, 3D pen and the Raspberry Pi (a credit cardsized computer).

pune Updated: Mar 25, 2018 15:02 IST
Ananya Barua
Ananya Barua
Hindustan Times,Pune
The Heramb MakerLab  was established in April 2014 by 39-year-old IT professional, Atul Yadav.
The Heramb MakerLab was established in April 2014 by 39-year-old IT professional, Atul Yadav. (HT PHOTO )

Class 12 student, Ainesh Advani is a 3D-printing enthusiast, who, awed by the technology, decided to bring his father, a retired scientist, to a training session held on Saturday, at the Heramb MakerLab, Pimpri-Chinchwad.

This was the first time, that this lab, located at Sant Tukaram Nagar, Pimpri, set up a training session for all including school students and adults. An hour-long personalized sessions for 10 individuals for two days, at a cost of Rs 1000 per person.

Established in April 2014 by 39-year-old IT professional, Atul Yadav, this lab has recently collaborated with Vigyan Ashram, Pabal to promote 3-D technology.

Aspiring to eventually study at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, a pioneer in the technology, 17-year-old Ainesh, found a way in the city to rekindle his passion.

“This is the technology of the future. From 2D images created on your laptop or computer screens you can go on to create full 3D models through this machine. With more advanced technology we can even use it in space, to create and print the machinery parts there itself, and assemble them to create the machine, instead of carrying it all the way from Earth. It is an extremely efficient way,” said Ainesh, a student of Global Indian International School, Pimpri-Chinchwad.

One of his interests lies in MIT’s ongoing project on 3D Bioprinting for tissue and organ fabrication which can pave the way towards creating artificial organs. He wishes to establish his research in the line, using 3D printing to easily create Braille books and other materials to empower the visually-impaired.

His father, Harish Advani, as a retired Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) scientist is equally awed by the results and its future implications.

“As my son wants to do his undergraduate degree at MIT, we had contacted them via social media asking why there was no Makerlab on 3D printing as it is everywhere else in the world. MIT has its own Fablabs. However, luckily we got a response that they have recently collaborated with Vigyan Ashram, Pabal for this. That NGO in turn has a tie-up with Heramb Makerlabs and that how my son and me, both Makers in spirit and work, came to learn this technology,” said 48-year old Advani.

Atul Yadav who has since been spearheading the Maker Movement in Pune said interested individuals and groups are assisted in using their technical and creative expertise to build and market products made out of e-waste or unused computer-related devices.

“Its surprising but true that in India this movement began way back in 1993 at Pabal’s Vigyan Ashram, and that sort of inspired me to open this multidisciplinary platform. Not many people know about Vigyan Ashram, so with their help we have reached out to several schools in urban and rural Maharashtra, as well as institutes like Dr D Y Patil College of Engineering, Maharashtra Institute of Technology, Bharati Vidyapeeth and so on,” said Yadav.

The newly launched 2-month old lab, now flaunts gadgets like the 3D printer, 3D pen and the Raspberry Pi (a credit cardsized computer).