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The research, provides new insights into how cancers evolve to adapt to changing environments and suggests ways to reduce drug resistance by combining therapies.(ANI)

Study reveals how ecDNA forms, drives cancer drug resistance

Washington | By Asian News International | Posted by Shivani Kale
UPDATED ON DEC 24, 2020 08:12 PM IST
The research, published in the journal Nature, provides new insights into how cancers evolve to adapt to changing environments and suggests ways to reduce drug resistance by combining therapies.
While more research is needed, this pharmaceutical could potentially be used for several cancer types with an overactive cell-signaling pathway.(Unsplash)
While more research is needed, this pharmaceutical could potentially be used for several cancer types with an overactive cell-signaling pathway.(Unsplash)

Leukemia drug may treat brain cancer in children

Asian News International | By Asian News International, Washington Dc
UPDATED ON SEP 22, 2019 01:35 PM IST
In a recent study, researchers suggested a new use of leukemia drug, nilotinib to heal a deadly pediatric brain cancer called medulloblastoma.
Drug resistance currently causes at least 700,000 deaths each year, including 230,000 from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The most common drug resistant pathogens, including E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Salmonella spp., among others.
Drug resistance currently causes at least 700,000 deaths each year, including 230,000 from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The most common drug resistant pathogens, including E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Salmonella spp., among others.

Drug-resistant diseases as big a threat as climate change: UN

Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By Sanchita Sharma
PUBLISHED ON APR 30, 2019 07:38 AM IST
Antimicrobial (including antibiotics, antivirals, antifungal and antiprotozoal) agents are critical to fight diseases in humans, animals and plants, but misuse and overuse is making an increasing number of them ineffective.
Unlike other fungi that rarely transmit between humans, C. auris can be passed from patient to patient in a hospital. This is because of its unusual ability to last for long periods of time on hospital surfaces, such as bed rails and door handles (Representational photo)(Arun Sharma/ HT Photo)
Unlike other fungi that rarely transmit between humans, C. auris can be passed from patient to patient in a hospital. This is because of its unusual ability to last for long periods of time on hospital surfaces, such as bed rails and door handles (Representational photo)(Arun Sharma/ HT Photo)

Drug-resistant fungi are a threat to modern medicine

By Isabel Frost and Ramanan Laxminarayan
UPDATED ON APR 19, 2019 07:40 PM IST
To prevent the outbreak of deadly infections such as Candida auris, hospital infection control must be taken seriously
As per the current government estimates calculated in 2017, India reported 204 new cases per 100,000 population.(AP)
As per the current government estimates calculated in 2017, India reported 204 new cases per 100,000 population.(AP)

Rise in Tuberculosis cases notified from private sector

Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By Rhythma Kaul
PUBLISHED ON MAR 24, 2019 11:30 PM IST
Drug resistant TB remains an area of concern, with 54% increase in the cases that came up to 60,000 new cases in 2018 as compared to 40,000 in 2017.
Even as the number of tuberculosis-related deaths in the city has declined over the past three years, an ongoing global study found nearly 40% of the tuberculosis (TB) patients in its Mumbai sample were infected with a drug-resistant form known as the Beijing strain. HT Photo by Kalpak Pathak(Hindustan Times)
Even as the number of tuberculosis-related deaths in the city has declined over the past three years, an ongoing global study found nearly 40% of the tuberculosis (TB) patients in its Mumbai sample were infected with a drug-resistant form known as the Beijing strain. HT Photo by Kalpak Pathak(Hindustan Times)

‘Beijing Tuberculosis strain cases rises to 40%’: Study

Mumbai | By Aayushi Pratap
UPDATED ON MAR 19, 2019 03:59 AM IST
The research is part of a global study called Comprehensive Resistance Prediction for Tuberculosis (CRyPTIC), which aims at building a “resistance catalogue” of TB bacteria by studying 0.1 million TB isolates across the globe.
A man poses as he displays his hand and face painted with messages during an HIV/AIDS awareness campaign on the eve of World AIDS Day.(PICTURE FOR REPRESENTATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY)
A man poses as he displays his hand and face painted with messages during an HIV/AIDS awareness campaign on the eve of World AIDS Day.(PICTURE FOR REPRESENTATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY)

Mother-to-child transmission of HIV drops notably in Maharashtra

Hindustan Times, Pune | By Nozia Sayyed
UPDATED ON DEC 01, 2018 02:44 PM IST
As against 54,167 positive cases of people living with HIV diagnosed in Maharashtra in 2011, only 15,119 new positive cases were detected in the first nine months of 2018.
Jean Lee, a PhD student at Melbourne's Doherty Institute, displays the superbug Staphylcocus epidermidis on an agar plate in Melbourne on September 4, 2018(AFP)
Jean Lee, a PhD student at Melbourne's Doherty Institute, displays the superbug Staphylcocus epidermidis on an agar plate in Melbourne on September 4, 2018(AFP)

Drug-resistant superbugs are spreading, and fast

Hindustan Times | By HT Correspondent
PUBLISHED ON SEP 10, 2018 12:46 PM IST
For India, this is a serious problem. The country has among the highest rates of unapproved drugs sold, many of which are over-the-counter drugs, and an indiscriminate use of antibiotics, which means that it becomes difficult to assess, control and limit Anti-Microbial Resistance (AMR).
Antibiotic use in India went up from 3.2 billion defined daily doses (DDD) to 6.5 billion in 2015.(Representational Image)
Antibiotic use in India went up from 3.2 billion defined daily doses (DDD) to 6.5 billion in 2015.(Representational Image)

Use of antibiotics in India more than doubles in 15 years: Study

Hindustan Times | By Sanchita Sharma, New Delhi
PUBLISHED ON MAR 27, 2018 04:50 PM IST
In 2015, the total global antibiotic consumption was 35 billion DDDs, a 65% increase from 2000, according to the analysis of antibiotic use in 76 countries.
According to the study, antibiotic use in India went up from 3.2 billion defined daily doses (DDD) to 6.5 billion in 2015, reflecting increasing economic growth and more access to the medication in both public and private sectors.(Shutterstock/Image for representative purpose)
According to the study, antibiotic use in India went up from 3.2 billion defined daily doses (DDD) to 6.5 billion in 2015, reflecting increasing economic growth and more access to the medication in both public and private sectors.(Shutterstock/Image for representative purpose)

India’s antibiotic use doubles in 15 years, common infections harder to treat: Study

Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By Sanchita Sharma, New Delhi
UPDATED ON MAR 27, 2018 01:33 PM IST
Rising incomes, over-the-counter sale, a poorly regulated private hospital sector, high rates of hospital infection, inexpensive antibiotics and frequent infectious disease outbreaks are driving consumption in India and other low- and middle-income countries.
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