Afghans sell children to survive as food crisis deepens under Taliban: Report

  • Canada-based think tank IFFRAS said that according to reports 95 per cent of Afghans do not have enough food to eat while half of the population is expected to face acute levels of hunger as the country's winter sets in early November.
A WFP release stated that the combined impacts of drought, conflict, Covid-19, and the economic crisis, have severely affected lives, livelihoods, and people's access to food. (REUTERS)
A WFP release stated that the combined impacts of drought, conflict, Covid-19, and the economic crisis, have severely affected lives, livelihoods, and people's access to food. (REUTERS)
Updated on Nov 09, 2021 05:28 AM IST
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ANI | By | Posted by Sharangee Dutta, Hindustan Times, New Delhi

With each passing day, the situation in Afghanistan is worsening under the new Taliban regime which does not have funds to procure food items and other essentials.

Severe lack of funds and an unprecedented surge in food prices have left scores of Afghans hungry and some people are forced to sell their children to survive, according to the Canada-based think tank International Forum for Rights and Security (IFFRAS).

"There are reports that 95 per cent of Afghans do not have enough food to eat while half of the population is expected to face acute levels of hunger as winter sets in early November," IFFRAS said.

More than half the population of Afghanistan - a record 22.8 million people - will face acute food insecurity from November, a UN aid organisation said on Monday.

This data regarding acute hunger was revealed in a new report issued by Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) by the Food Security and Agriculture Cluster of Afghanistan, co-led by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN and the UN World Food Programme (WFP).

A WFP release stated that the combined impacts of drought, conflict, Covid-19, and the economic crisis, have severely affected lives, livelihoods, and people's access to food.

The report's findings come as Afghanistan's harsh winter looms, threatening to cut off areas of the country where families desperately depend on humanitarian assistance to survive the freezing winter months.

The IPC report has found that more than one in two Afghans will be facing crisis or emergency levels of acute food insecurity through November 2021 to March 2022 lean season, requiring urgent humanitarian interventions to meet basic food needs, protect livelihoods and prevent a humanitarian catastrophe.

The report also notes that this is the highest number of acutely food insecure people ever recorded in the ten years the UN has been conducting IPC analyses in Afghanistan. Globally, Afghanistan is home to one of the largest number of people in acute food insecurity in both absolute and relative terms

"It is urgent that we act efficiently and effectively to speed up and scale up our delivery in Afghanistan before winter cuts off a large part of the country, with millions of people - including farmers, women, young children and the elderly - going hungry in the freezing winter. It is a matter of life or death. We cannot wait and see humanitarian disasters unfolding in front of us - it is unacceptable!" said QU Dongyu, FAO Director-General.

"Afghanistan is now among the world's worst humanitarian crises - if not the worst - and food security has all but collapsed. This winter, millions of Afghans will be forced to choose between migration and starvation unless we can step up our life-saving assistance, and unless the economy can be resuscitated. We are on a countdown to catastrophe and if we don't act now, we will have a total disaster on our hands," said David Beasley, WFP Executive Director.

"Hunger is rising and children are dying. We can't feed people on promises - funding commitments must turn into hard cash, and the international community must come together to address this crisis, which is fast spinning out of control," Beasley warned.

The IPC report reflects a 37 per cent increase in the number of Afghans facing acute hunger since the last assessment issued in April 2021, WFP said.

Among those at risk are 3.2 million children under five who are expected to suffer from acute malnutrition by the end of the year. In October, WFP and UNICEF warned that one million children were at risk of dying from severe acute malnutrition without immediate life-saving treatment.

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