New Delhi -°C
Today in New Delhi, India

Dec 14, 2019-Saturday
-°C

Humidity
-

Wind
-

Select city

Metro cities - Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata

Other cities - Noida, Gurgaon, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Bhopal , Chandigarh , Dehradun, Indore, Jaipur, Lucknow, Patna, Ranchi

Saturday, Dec 14, 2019

Out of White House race, Harris to look out for President Trump at trial

Trump has watched the Democratic race closely, criticizing the candidates, giving them insulting pet-names. But he had not come up with one of those for Harris, and had even seemed impressed by her opening announcement in February.

world Updated: Dec 04, 2019 21:27 IST
Yashwant Raj
Yashwant Raj
Hindustan Times, Washington
Senator Kamala Harris is out of the 2020 presidential race .
Senator Kamala Harris is out of the 2020 presidential race .(REUTERS PHOTO.)
         

Democratic Senator Kamala Harris is out of the 2020 presidential race but President Donald Trump remains in her crosshairs. “Don’t worry, Mr. President, I will see you at your trial,” she said in a tweet on Tuesday, firing back at a mocking send-off from the President.

“Too bad,” Trump had said in a tweet. “We will miss you Kamala!” As a senator, Harris will be waiting for Trump when the US Senate takes up his impeachment trial, after the House of Representatives votes to determine, and it will, the charges against him, called the articles of impeachment.

Trump has watched the Democratic race closely, criticizing the candidates, giving them insulting pet-names. But he had not come up with one of those for Harris, and had even seemed impressed by her opening announcement in February. He had called her “Kameela” back then. But cleaned it up subsequently.

Harris, the first Indian American to run for the White House, bowed out of the race on Tuesday saying she does not have the financial resources needed to continue and she is “not a billionaire” who can fund her own campaign, unlike, and no names named, rivals Michael Bloomberg and Tom Steyer.

Harris’s campaign was struggling with depleting resources and it had shut down several offices in recent weeks and laid off staffers. And there had been reports of bitter in-fighting among factions in the campaign.

Harris told her supporters in an email she was suspending her campaign because of lack of funds. “My campaign for president simply doesn’t have the financial resources we need to continue,” she added. “It is with deep regret — but also with deep gratitude — that I am suspending my campaign today.”

Harris could still stay in the race, but as a running mate with whoever wins the presidential nomination eventually. Speculation started soon after she made her exit official that she could be picked for vice-president, refueling old rumors about joining former vice-president Joe Biden’s ticket.

Harris’s exit marks the end of yet another bid by an Indian American for the White House. The first was Bobby Jindal, the former Republican governor of Louisiana. He was the first Indian American, male or female, to run for US president. He did not last the bruising 2015-2016 Republican primaries that were dominated from start to finish by a New York business tycoon who went on to win the White House, Donald Trump.

While Indian-Americans were excited “one of them” was running for president, they had also watched with some disquiet as she chose to be seen more as African American — her mother was from Chennai, India and father from Jamaica. She was seen as “not owning her Indian-ness enough,” said a top Democratic strategist of Indian descent, who wanted not to be identified to be able to speak freely.

Harris, a first-time Democratic senator from California, had entered the race with much fanfare and excitement. She was seen as tough, smart and charismatic and was seen in the same mould as President Barack Obama — one TV show host also called her the “female Obama”. She had also reported high collections and made a mark in the first debate with an epic take down of Biden, the frontrunner.

Even while Harris polled among the top five candidates for months, her candidacy was marked by ambivalence and confusion on issues closest to Democrats, such as healthcare. The senator seemed averse to taking risks and often second-guessed herself. She made several flip-flops that raised serious questions about her understanding of the issue.

Harris began slipping in polls and her campaign appeared to be in trouble. She was sixth in the December 2 RealClearPolitics average of polls at 3.4%, behind Biden, Senators Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, Mayor Pete Buttigieg and businessman Michael Bloomberg.

There are now 15 candidates left in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination to take on President Donald Trump in 2020 and try and deny him a second term.