350th Prakash Parva: Bihari handicrafts, cuisines a hit in Patna’s ‘mini Punjab’ | india-news | Hindustan Times
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350th Prakash Parva: Bihari handicrafts, cuisines a hit in Patna’s ‘mini Punjab’

The historical Gandhi Maidan has turned into a mini Punjab with thousands of guests paying obeisance at the replica of Takht Harmandir Sahib daily.

india Updated: Jan 04, 2017 14:33 IST
HT Correspondent
350th Prakash Parva
Stalls of Bihari cuisines are attracting both Bihari and Punjabi visitors alike.(HT Photo)

The historical Gandhi Maidan has turned into a mini Punjab with thousands of guests paying obeisance at the replica of Takht Harmandir Sahib daily.

Pilgrims who have come from different parts of India and abroad, including the United States of America, Europe and China, are also utilising the rare opportunity to go on shopping spree, as local businessmen put their best foot forward to attract the Sikh community to Bihari culture and food fare.

Stalls of khadi kurtis and dupattas, terracotta items, jute bags, jewelleries and khadi cotton bedsheets are attracting Punjabi visitors who are also appreciative of the products of Bihar.

Stalls of Bihari cuisines are attracting both Bihari and Punjabi visitors alike. Food stalls of tilkut from Gaya , khaaja, kesar peda, launglata, chandrakala, lakhto, balushahi, anarsa and thekua are attracting good business too.

The stall on jute jewellery from Arya Jute of Patna has already seen good footfall of customers from Punjab.

“The pieces are very creative. They are made of jute which is rarely seen in Punjab. I will buy four sets for my daughters,” said Balwinder Kaur, who has come from Amritsar to attend the 350th Prakash Parv.

Middle aged Manpreet Singh from Bhatinda was busy selecting khadi jackets in various colours. “I have seen politicians wearing such bundi (sleeveless jackets). I always wanted to buy one for myself. Here the price is quite reasonable. I will buy one today,” he said. The jackets cost Rs 1,200 each.

Khadi suit pieces embellished with Madhubani paintings cost Rs 1,000 and Bhagalpuri silk dupattas priced at Rs 600 are also attracting women in large numbers.

“People love some of these products and most stalls have seen good business. Punjabis are loving the suit pieces we have and they are also cheaper than in other parts of the country,” said stall owner, Smita.

“We are trying to impress the guests with our dishes and build a brand of our culture so that they keep visiting our state,” said Roushan Singh, a stall owner.

Praising the arrangements made by the Bihar government, Amanpreet Bhalla of Amritsar said, “The city is very clean and the management of the whole event is very good. Contrary to bad publicity of the state, we are finding the scene here quite different.”