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Thani Oruvan review: Good vs evil tale marred by a bad script

How pharmaceutical cartels withhold cures in the greed to spin money is narrated through the noble deeds of an IPS officer, Mithran (Jayam Ravi), who makes it his career's aim to nail baddie Siddharth Abhimanyu (Aravind Swamy).

movie reviews Updated: Jan 31, 2017 19:10 IST
Gautaman Bhaskaran
Thani Oruvan Review

How pharmaceutical cartels withhold cures in the greed to spin money is at the heart of Thani Oruvan. (ThaniOruvanOfficial/Facebook)

Thani Oruvan
Director: Mohan Raja
Cast: Jayam Ravi, Aravind Swamy, Nasser, Nayanthara, Ganesh Ramaiah, Ganesh Venkatraman
Rating: 2.5/5

Mohan Raja -- known for films like Santosh and Thillangadi -- directs his brother, Jayam Ravi, in the cop-chase-villain story, Thani Oruvan (The Lone One) that relies on high octave thrill to drive home a rather cliched point. How pharmaceutical cartels withhold cures in the greed to spin money is narrated through the painstakingly noble deeds of an Indian Police Service officer, Mithran (portrayed by a rather wooden Jayam Ravi), who makes it his career's aim to nail the king of all baddies, Siddharth Abhimanyu (Aravind Swamy as an excellent antagonist, suave, cool, calculating and bloody ruthless).

In fact, Siddharth does not allow any obstacle in his path to get a new medicine for the absolute cure of diabetes -- which he discovers -- into the hands of foreign companies for a grand sum of money. Indeed, even as a 15-old-boy, when he agrees to own up for a murder committed by his father's political guru, the boy has this devilish ability to twist a situation in his favour. And the father (Ganesh Ramaiah in yet another repeat performance of the same old comic character he has been essaying for a long time) plays along -- often innocently. A pawn in their notorious game is the state's chief minister (Nasser), who appears unbelievably helpless.



Watch Thani Oruvan trailer here:

A big flaw of Indian cinema is its tendency to stretch the script to a point where even suspension of disbelief becomes difficult. There are several such situations in Thani Oruvan which, however, gets glossed over by the life-and-death games which Mithran and Siddharth play, and till about the very end, the bad guy -- hiding behind a veneer of sophistication -- seems to get all his moves right. But then, India cinema has to follow the age-old mythological tradition of the good winning over the evil.

The path to this is, of course, paved with scoundrels willing to even sacrifice newborn babies and get their hands bloodied -- all to be part of the huge pharma empire.