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Protests against Nepal constitution to continue till demands met

Political parties and organizations opposed to Nepal’s new constitution decided on Wednesday to continue their agitation till their demands are addressed.

world Updated: May 18, 2016 17:01 IST
Utpal Parashar
Supporters of Nepalese minority ethnic groups clash with police during a protest against the government outside the prime minister's residence in Kathmandu on Tuesday.
Supporters of Nepalese minority ethnic groups clash with police during a protest against the government outside the prime minister's residence in Kathmandu on Tuesday.(AP)

Political parties and organizations opposed to Nepal’s new constitution decided on Wednesday to continue with their agitation till their demands are met.

“Federal Alliance has decided to continue the protests till the constitution is rewritten to address demands of Madhesis, Tharus, backward, marginalized, tribal, Muslim, Dalit, women etc.,” said a statement from the umbrella organisation of 29 parties from Madhes region bordering India, indigenous people and other minorities. 

The alliance has decided to carry out rallies for the next 10 days in various parts of Kathmandu Valley, beginning on Friday. Two rallies will be held in Birgunj and Pokhara also. 

Hundreds of protesters had picketed outside Singha Darbar, the seat of government, on May 15 and May 16, and outside the prime minister’s official residence on May 17. 

Violent protests in Madhes since August last year had resulted in over 50 deaths. A border blockade imposed by anti-constitution protesters for five months till February this year had led to severe scarcity of essential goods.

Talks between the protesters and the government have failed to yield any outcome. Prime Minister KP Sharma Oli has stated that while “genuine demands” would be addressed by amendments, there is no question of re-writing the statute.