Quinton de Kock (left) celebrates Fakhar Zaman's run out in the second ODI. (Twitter)
Quinton de Kock (left) celebrates Fakhar Zaman's run out in the second ODI. (Twitter)

Fakhar Zaman's controversial run out for 193 involving de Kock in 2nd ODI sparks 'spirit of cricket' debate on Twitter

  • Pakistan batsman Fakhar Zaman, who played one of the best innings in the history of the 50-over game, fell to a cheeky run out initiated by opposition wicketkeeper Quinton de Kock.
UPDATED ON APR 05, 2021 03:26 PM IST

Pakistan batsman Fakhar Zaman, who played one of the best innings in his career, fell to a controversial run-out involving South Africa's opposition wicketkeeper Quinton de Kock in the 2nd ODI on Sunday. Zaman's score at the time was 193, and the 'spirit of cricket' has been summoned in form of a Twitter debate once again after the incident.

The moment arrived on the first ball of the last over when Zaman, batting on 192, thumped the ball to long-off. Aiden Markram, who was stationed there, saw the batsmen going for a second run after a slight stutter and decided to have a go at Zaman's end.

Also read: 'If so, then it's Not out': MCC explains law after Zaman's controversial run-out

Quinton de Kock appeared to suggest that the ball was going towards the non-striker end which prompted Zaman to slow down. By the time he realised the ball is coming his way, he was too late as Aiden's throw hit the stumps directly, bringing his innings to an end.


Pakistan eventually fell short of their target of 342 and lost the match by 17 runs. The incident caused a huge Twitter debate, with most netizens calling for MCC's Law 41.5.1 to be invoked. The law read: "it is unfair for any fielder wilfully to attempt, by word or action, to distract, deceive or obstruct either batsman after the striker has received the ball."

Here's how the world of Twitter reacted:


After the match, batsman Zaman said the fault was his and not de Kock. "The fault was mine as I was too busy looking out for Haris Rauf at the other end as I felt he'd started off a little late from his crease, so I thought he was in trouble. The rest is up to the match referee, but I don't think it's Quinton's fault," ESPNcricinfo quoted Zaman as saying.

MCC on Monday morning weighed in on the incident through two tweets.

The first tweet stated MCC's Law 41.5.1 while the second gave MCC's stance on the incident.

"The Law is clear, with the offence being an ATTEMPT to deceive, rather than the batsman actually being deceived.

It’s up to the umpires to decide if there was such an attempt. If so, then it's Not out, 5 Penalty runs + the 2 they ran, and batsmen choose who faces next ball," MCC said in the Tweet.

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