Today in New Delhi, India
Nov 21, 2018-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Two-day workshop on all- India tiger survey begins in Doon

Ahead of the All India Tiger Estimation, a two-day training session of forest officers above the rank of ranger began at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) in Dehradun on Thursday

dehradun Updated: Jan 04, 2018 20:59 IST
Nihi Sharma
Nihi Sharma
Hindustan Times
all- India tiger survey,Wildlife Institute of India,Dehradun
A Tiger crossing a road at Corbett Tiger Reserve in Ramnagar. HT Photo

Ahead of the All India Tiger Estimation, a two-day training session of forest officers above the rank of ranger began at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) in Dehradun on Thursday.

More than 50 officers are attending the workshop meant for smooth conduct of first phase of the countrywide tiger survey. After training at Valmiki Tiger Reserve in Bihar, forest officials imparted their learning to their colleagues so that forest guards could be trained in respective divisions.

The previous national tiger census in 2014 pegged the big cat population at 2,226 , up from 1,706 in 2010. Uttarakhand with 340 tigers had the second largest big cat population in 2014. Karnataka topped the list with 406 tigers. Madhya Pradesh (308) and Tamil Nadu (229) were the other two states with substantial tiger population.

The Phase I exercise with four components - carnivore sign survey, ungulate survey, habitat condition and indirect survey of carnivore and prey base - will roll out in mid-January. It is being considered a mammoth exercise, according to officers, as every beat (the smallest unit of a reserve area) will be manually studied.

But there is some good news for forest personnel. Instead of noting details on paper, forest guards will be uploading the data on the new application ‘Monitoring System for Tiger, Intensive Patrolling and Ecological Status’ which will end duplication and help officers in understanding the spread of both carnivore and prey in the tiger-populated landscape in the state.

“The first phase is the most rigorous phase of the estimation which will need at least 10-day field monitoring by every forest guard. For this, their training is necessary.Hence, the officers trained here will train their staff. By mid- January, we will be able to start the process,” additional principal chief conservator of forest (APCCF) Dhananjai Mohan told Hindustan Times. Mohan had imparted training to officers.

The Phase II includes compilation of data following which the most integral part of the estimation - camera trapping - is likely to begin in February. It will take at least four months for the officers to complete camera trap exercise in tiger habitats.

The three phases is likely to conclude in June after which the WII will compile, evaluate and assess the data. The compilation will be done by this year end with inputs from all states. The result of the estimation is likely to be declared in January 2019.

First Published: Jan 04, 2018 20:57 IST