The condition occurs commonly in critically ill children admitted to paediatric intensive care units often because of reduced blood supply to the kidneys(Pixabay)
The condition occurs commonly in critically ill children admitted to paediatric intensive care units often because of reduced blood supply to the kidneys(Pixabay)

Biomarker combination predicts kidney injury in critically ill children

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified a unique method of identifying the early signs of a potentially serious condition known as Acute Kidney Injury (AKI).
By Asian News International | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta | Washington [US]
UPDATED ON NOV 02, 2020 09:21 PM IST

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified a unique method of identifying the early signs of a potentially serious condition known as Acute Kidney Injury (AKI).

The condition occurs commonly in critically ill children admitted to paediatric intensive care units often because of reduced blood supply to the kidneys (for example due to dehydration or sepsis), heart bypass surgery, or due to medicines which can cause kidney injury.

Children who develop AKI have poorer immediate outcomes including longer hospital stay and increased mortality. They also have an increased risk of long-term reduction in kidney function (Chronic Kidney Disease).

Diagnosis of AKI depends on identifying the elevation of a substance called creatinine in the blood. However, this only rises slowly after a kidney injury, therefore recognition of AKI is frequently delayed. If doctors can identify children at high risk for AKI early on, then pre-emptive therapy, such as renal replacement therapy (dialysis), could be instituted earlier to protect the kidneys from further injury.

In this study, led by Dr Rachel McGalliard and Dr Steve McWilliam, the team looked at the potential of two early markers to predict severe AKI in children admitted to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust.

The first, a protein called Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL), measured in urine and blood, and the second is a clinical score called the Renal Angina Index (RAI).

After an extensive study, the team found that a combination of RAI and urinary NGAL on the first day of PICU admission provided an accurate prediction for severe AKI - a potentially life-saving discovery for many critically-ill children.

In the study, 16 per cent of children admitted to PICU developed severe AKI within 72 hours of admission, and 7 per cent required renal replacement therapy. In keeping with previous studies, the development of AKI was associated with prolonged PICU admission and increased mortality. A novel finding in this study was that AKI was also associated with increased risk of hospital-acquired infection.

“I am most proud of the analysis being in a clinically heterogeneous paediatric population. Potentially, these results could lead to earlier identification of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill children and could be used to trial pre-emptive therapy, if validated in further studies,” Dr McGalliard, an NIHR Academic Clinicainfectionl Fellow in Paediatric Infectious Diseases and first author on the paper, said.

“The results of this study are extremely exciting. The renal angina index is a simple calculation that could easily be automatically provided in electronic medical records at PICU admission. NGAL assays compatible with most clinical laboratory analysers are now widely available, making its real-time measurement in these critically unwell children realistic,” Dr McWilliam, a Senior Lecturer in Paediatric Clinical Pharmacology, said.

“We are now in a great position to investigate whether having these results available in real-time in PICUs could lead to reduced rates of AKI in these children and whether they can be used to effectively target protective strategies to those at high risk of AKI,” Dr McWilliam, a Senior Lecturer in Paediatric Clinical Pharmacology added.

(This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text.)

Follow more stories on Facebook and Twitter

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
app
Close
Want to get your stamina back post Covid? Check out Varun Dhawan’s fitness video(Instagram/varundvn)
Want to get your stamina back post Covid? Check out Varun Dhawan’s fitness video(Instagram/varundvn)

Want to get your stamina back post Covid? Check out Varun Dhawan’s fitness video

By Zarafshan Shiraz
UPDATED ON JAN 20, 2021 04:28 PM IST
  • From right side lateral travelling ape to full scorpion, here’s how Coolie No.1 star Varun Dhawan recovered and got his stamina back after suffering from Covid-19 | Watch
Close
A study published in journal Human Gene Therapy shows that gene editing therapies, including CRISPR-Cas frameworks, offer the possibility to address transformations causing inherited retinal degenerations, a leading cause of blindness.(ANI)
A study published in journal Human Gene Therapy shows that gene editing therapies, including CRISPR-Cas frameworks, offer the possibility to address transformations causing inherited retinal degenerations, a leading cause of blindness.(ANI)

Study highlights genome altering can help to treat human retinal degeneration

ANI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 20, 2021 03:35 PM IST
A study published in journal Human Gene Therapy shows that gene editing therapies, including CRISPR-Cas frameworks, offer the possibility to address transformations causing inherited retinal degenerations, a leading cause of blindness.
Close
Representational image(Unsplash)
Representational image(Unsplash)

Loss of smell may be best predictor of Covid-19, research confirms

PTI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 20, 2021 02:48 PM IST
The research found that only around half of patients with a loss of smell got their sense of smell back after forty days.
Close
During the pandemic, burnout among health care professionals is a pervasive public health concern as the health care professionals are required to work even longer hours in high-stress situations.(ANI)
During the pandemic, burnout among health care professionals is a pervasive public health concern as the health care professionals are required to work even longer hours in high-stress situations.(ANI)

Burnout among health care professions a public health concern during pandemic

ANI
UPDATED ON JAN 20, 2021 02:19 PM IST
During the pandemic, burnout among health care professionals is a pervasive public health concern as the health care professionals are required to work even longer hours in high-stress situations.
Close
Representational image(WebMD)
Representational image(WebMD)

Fatty acid may combat multiple sclerosis. Here's how

ANI
UPDATED ON JAN 20, 2021 12:36 PM IST
A new study by Yale University explains that the abnormal immune system response that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) by attacking and damaging the central nervous system can be set off by the lack of a specific fatty acid in fat tissue.
Close
Early life experiences can have an outsized effect on brain development and neurobiological health.(Unsplash)
Early life experiences can have an outsized effect on brain development and neurobiological health.(Unsplash)

Study: Childhood neglect leaves generational imprint

ANI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 20, 2021 11:21 AM IST
Early life experiences can have an effect on brain development and neurobiological health. A research shows that those effects can be passed down to generations, reporting that the children of mothers who had faced childhood neglect displayed altered brain circuitry involved in fear and anxiety.
Close
How Covid-19 has permanently changed the fitness industry(Pexels)
How Covid-19 has permanently changed the fitness industry(Pexels)

The permanent effects of Covid-19 on fitness industry

Bloomberg
PUBLISHED ON JAN 20, 2021 07:51 AM IST
Because of the novel coronavirus outbreak, virtual fitness classes and mental health options were in demand during 2020. Doesn't look like that trend will end anytime soon, gym owners predict.
Close
The study involved all healthcare providers in the South West of England taking a new approach.(Unsplash)
The study involved all healthcare providers in the South West of England taking a new approach.(Unsplash)

Research suggest simple, cheap test can help save lives from colorectal cancer

ANI, London [uk]
PUBLISHED ON JAN 19, 2021 06:59 PM IST
New research has demonstrated that a simple, cheap test can help identify who is at risk of developing colorectal cancer, aiding early diagnosis and potentially saving lives.
Close
According to the International Diabetes Federation, the number of people with diabetes in India is expected to rise to 69.9 million from 40.9 million by 2025.(Pixabay)
According to the International Diabetes Federation, the number of people with diabetes in India is expected to rise to 69.9 million from 40.9 million by 2025.(Pixabay)

How can you treat diabetes the Ayurvedic way

ANI, Gurugram (haryana) [india]
PUBLISHED ON JAN 19, 2021 05:58 PM IST
One of India's leading Ayurvedic medicines developers, Butterfly Ayurveda, recommends people to take care of their sugar levels with Ayurveda, particularly during this pandemic since they are at huge risk of Covid-19.
Close
Despite the coronavirus restricting gym capacity while shuttering some entirely, the traditional January spike in memberships has matched—and in some ways exceeded—those of years past.(Unsplash)
Despite the coronavirus restricting gym capacity while shuttering some entirely, the traditional January spike in memberships has matched—and in some ways exceeded—those of years past.(Unsplash)

How Covid-19 has permanently changed the fitness industry

Bloomberg
PUBLISHED ON JAN 19, 2021 05:15 PM IST
Covid-19 has accelerated adoption of a hybrid model of online/in-person workouts that more brick-and-mortar gyms are likely to retain when the pandemic recedes.
Close
Representational image(Unsplash)
Representational image(Unsplash)

Fried food intake linked to heightened serious heart disease, stroke risk

ANI
UPDATED ON JAN 19, 2021 01:25 PM IST
While fried food is considered detrimental to health, a new study sheds light on its effects. The findings of a pooled analysis of the available research suggest that fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke.
Close
It is well known that people who drink a lot of alcohol regularly are at increased risk of developing heart failure, and heart failure can increase the incidence of atrial fibrillation.(Unsplash)
It is well known that people who drink a lot of alcohol regularly are at increased risk of developing heart failure, and heart failure can increase the incidence of atrial fibrillation.(Unsplash)

One alcoholic drink in a day linked to risk of atrial fibrillation: Study

ANI, Washington [us]
PUBLISHED ON JAN 19, 2021 01:21 PM IST
A study of nearly 108,000 people has found that people who regularly drink a modest amount of alcohol are at increased risk of atrial fibrillation, a condition where the heart beats in an abnormal rhythm.
Close
Study: Androgen therapy can be alternative treatment strategy for breast cancer(Twitter/MoriKessler)
Study: Androgen therapy can be alternative treatment strategy for breast cancer(Twitter/MoriKessler)

Study: Androgen therapy can be alternative treatment strategy for breast cancer

ANI
PUBLISHED ON JAN 19, 2021 08:07 AM IST
  • A new discovery finds positive role of androgens in breast cancer treatment. Study says androgen therapy has immediate implications for women resistant to current forms of endocrine therapy
Close
Prior to Covid-19 there was a strong global health discourse that argued against lockdowns and similar mass quarantines.(Bloomberg)
Prior to Covid-19 there was a strong global health discourse that argued against lockdowns and similar mass quarantines.(Bloomberg)

From the Bubonic plague to 2021, why lockdowns look set to stay

Bloomberg
PUBLISHED ON JAN 18, 2021 05:54 PM IST
A year after the lockdown imposed in the Chinese city of Wuhan shocked the world, the tactic is turning out to be an enduring tool for quelling the coronavirus almost everywhere.
Close
The survey also found that those with blood group 'O' may be less susceptible to the infection, while people with 'B' and 'AB' blood groups were at a higher risk.(Unsplash)
The survey also found that those with blood group 'O' may be less susceptible to the infection, while people with 'B' and 'AB' blood groups were at a higher risk.(Unsplash)

Seropositivity for Covid-19 found to be lesser in smokers, vegetarians

PTI, New Delhi
PUBLISHED ON JAN 18, 2021 04:35 PM IST
Smokers and vegetarians were found to have lower seropositivity indicating that they may be at a lesser risk of getting infected by coronavirus.
Close
SHARE
Story Saved
OPEN APP