Mental health: Things that depression makes you wrongly believe in

Updated on Jul 12, 2022 04:15 PM IST

Are you believing in all the lies that depression tells you? Here's what depression does to your mind while you try to navigate your way back to normal life.

Depression sometimes makes people believe that life is not worth living(Unsplash)
Depression sometimes makes people believe that life is not worth living(Unsplash)

Mind is a complex place and depression can make it even more messy. The thoughts and feelings that once made us look forward to exciting things ahead can turn into a never-ending cycle of dark and negative ruminations that could make you question your existence. Things and activities that were once enjoyable could now seem like a compulsory ritual with no meaning attached to it. Loved ones who made you smile could seem selfish and self-centred while you struggle to find a way in maze of your falling mental health. Mental health experts, however, say this is what depression does to your mind as hormones go into imbalance and make you believe in things that are far from true. (Also read: Lesser-known habits of depressed people they hide from the world)

Dr Samir Parikh, Director, Mental Health and Behavioural Sciences, Fortis Healthcare blames all these changes in the thoughts process to chemical balance triggered by depression that affects our mood and make us feel low and negative.

"It's like wearing dark glasses and seeing everything dark. For example, some people may start overvaluing some of the negative experiences, maximising them and minimising all the good things that are happening to them. Some people may start thinking that only worse is going to happen because they are in a negative frame of mind so they are not able to recognise positivity. Some people start feeling that I will not enjoy what I used to do. It's happening because the moods are not good. So, things that you like doing, you are not able to like doing and because of that you are not enjoying anything, you have lost interest in everything," Dr Parikh tells HT Digital in a telephonic interview. (Also read: 5 amazing things that happen to your mind when you take a break)

Dr Parikh says most of the thoughts revolve around - worthlessness (I'm not good enough), hopelessness (there is no future), and helplessness (nobody can get me out of this problem).

The psychiatrist says because of this chemical imbalance, depression makes people believe that life is not worth living and this is the reason they get self-harming thoughts.

Here are some of the thought patterns that people with depression struggle from:

'This is not my cup of tea'

Depressed people have negative and hopeless thoughts or core beliefs about themselves, their experiences in the world and about the future as well.

"Sometimes depression can make you have wrong thoughts about self-esteem and self-worth. It can make you feel diffident and lead to feelings of self-pity. You begin to doubt your abilities to do the things that you used to do on a daily basis," Dr Sonal Anand, Psychiatrist, Wockhardt Hospitals, Mira Road told HT Digital.

'There is no point of living'

Dr Anand says depression can lead to intense feelings of hopelessness and frustration which trigger suicidal thoughts and this can overpower all other thoughts and may lead to self-harm.

'All bad things happen to me'

Sometimes depression can also make you feel wrongly about the environment. One small negative thing in the environment can give feelings of the whole environment or situation being unfavourable and absolutely negative.

"One can't see the silver lining. You may perceive the situation in only one negative dimension," says Dr Anand.

'Nobody loves me'

Dr Anand says depression can also lead to changed feelings about closed ones even though that might not be the case in reality. "Some levels of depression can cause you to doubt your partner or loved one about the way they feel about you. You might feel ignored or misunderstood due to the clouding of negative thoughts," says the psychiatrist.

Dr Samir Parikh suggests CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) to turn negative thoughts into positive ones and urges people to ask for help if they feel hopeless and aimless.

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