Photos: Sero-survey data shows 4.7 million in Delhi exposed to Covid-19

Updated On Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

Data from a sero-prevalence survey released on July 20 shows that 4.7 million people, i.e. nearly one in every four people residing in Delhi, are exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes coronavirus (Covid-19) disease. The survey was commissioned by the Indian Health Ministry and conducted between June 27 and July 10. Survey teams were formed for all the 11 districts of Delhi, and blood samples were collected which were later tested in labs for Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies.

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A health worker collects a swab sample from a man as others queue up for Covid-19 tests at Ramlila Maidan, New Delhi on July 21. According to the Union Health Ministry’s data from a sero-prevalence survey released on July 20, as much as 23.48% of Delhi’s population - 4.7 million people have been exposed to the virus that causes coronavirus (Covid-19) disease, HT reported. (Sonu Mehta / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

A health worker collects a swab sample from a man as others queue up for Covid-19 tests at Ramlila Maidan, New Delhi on July 21. According to the Union Health Ministry’s data from a sero-prevalence survey released on July 20, as much as 23.48% of Delhi’s population - 4.7 million people have been exposed to the virus that causes coronavirus (Covid-19) disease, HT reported. (Sonu Mehta / HT Photo)

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A health worker pours a sample into a Covid-19 rapid testing kit at a testing centre in Khajuri Khas, New Delhi on July 17. The results of the sero-prevalence study have shown that on an average, across Delhi, the prevalence of IgG [Immunoglobulin G] antibodies is 23.48 %. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

A health worker pours a sample into a Covid-19 rapid testing kit at a testing centre in Khajuri Khas, New Delhi on July 17. The results of the sero-prevalence study have shown that on an average, across Delhi, the prevalence of IgG [Immunoglobulin G] antibodies is 23.48 %. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

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Heavy vehicular movement seen at South Extension in New Delhi on July 21. Survey teams were formed for all the 11 districts of Delhi, and blood samples were collected from 21,387 individuals. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

Heavy vehicular movement seen at South Extension in New Delhi on July 21. Survey teams were formed for all the 11 districts of Delhi, and blood samples were collected from 21,387 individuals. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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Medical professionals wearing PPE coveralls seen at work at Lok Nayak Jai Prakash (LNJP) Hospital in New Delhi on July 21. The samples collected during the survey were tested in labs for Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

Medical professionals wearing PPE coveralls seen at work at Lok Nayak Jai Prakash (LNJP) Hospital in New Delhi on July 21. The samples collected during the survey were tested in labs for Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

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Commuters seen in Jangpura, New Delhi on July 17. According to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), IgG is the most common antibody in blood and other body fluids that the immune systems produces to protect against bacterial and viral infections and allergens. IgG can take up time to form after an infection, and is useful in detecting a past infection, HT reported. (Biplov Bhuyan / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

Commuters seen in Jangpura, New Delhi on July 17. According to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), IgG is the most common antibody in blood and other body fluids that the immune systems produces to protect against bacterial and viral infections and allergens. IgG can take up time to form after an infection, and is useful in detecting a past infection, HT reported. (Biplov Bhuyan / HT Photo)

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Trtaffic moves past a mural of Covid-19 front line workers at RK Puram in New Delhi on July 20. The Health Ministry had commissioned the sero-surveillance study in Delhi, which has a population of about 20 million, and was jointly conducted by the National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) and the Delhi government between June 27 and July 10. (Sonu Mehta / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

Trtaffic moves past a mural of Covid-19 front line workers at RK Puram in New Delhi on July 20. The Health Ministry had commissioned the sero-surveillance study in Delhi, which has a population of about 20 million, and was jointly conducted by the National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) and the Delhi government between June 27 and July 10. (Sonu Mehta / HT Photo)

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A health worker gears up inside the Common Wealth Games (CWG) Village Sports Complex which is temporarily converted into a Covid-19 care centre in Patparganj on July 19. Experts in community medicine say that since the samples were collected in end-June and the beginning of July, there is a possibility more people may have developed antibodies against the virus by now, HT reported. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

A health worker gears up inside the Common Wealth Games (CWG) Village Sports Complex which is temporarily converted into a Covid-19 care centre in Patparganj on July 19. Experts in community medicine say that since the samples were collected in end-June and the beginning of July, there is a possibility more people may have developed antibodies against the virus by now, HT reported. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

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A view inside a sample collection centre for Covid-19 tests at Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College and Hospital in New Delhi on July 20. While real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) test is the front-line test for clinical diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus (Covid-19) disease. Robust antibody tests are critical for surveillance to understand the proportion of population exposed to infection. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jul 22, 2020 11:00 AM IST

A view inside a sample collection centre for Covid-19 tests at Nehru Homoeopathic Medical College and Hospital in New Delhi on July 20. While real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) test is the front-line test for clinical diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus (Covid-19) disease. Robust antibody tests are critical for surveillance to understand the proportion of population exposed to infection. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

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