Photos: Brazil’s coronavirus case count crosses 5 million

Brazil surpassed 5 million confirmed coronavirus cases on October 7 to become the world’s third hardest coronavirus-hit country, according to Johns Hopkins University’s tally. Currently, Brazil's figures have fallen to about 27,000 cases and 700 deaths daily from more than 45,000 cases and 1,000 deaths per day from when the country was at the peak of Covid-19 infections. Experts say that people shunning isolation and taking to public activities is a pressing concern as campaigning mayors are allowing bars, restaurants and movie theaters to reopen. According to data from Brazil’s statistical institutes, the percentage of people in strict isolation or leaving home only when necessary dropped to 57% in mid-September, from 68% in early July.

Updated On Oct 09, 2020 06:15 PM IST
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A man walks next to a graffiti depicting a cleaner in protective gear spraying viruses with the face of Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro in Rio de Janeiro on October 7. According to John Hopkins University’s tally, Brazil surpassed 5 million confirmed coronavirus cases on October 7 to become world’s third hardest coronavirus-hit country. (Ricardo Moraes / Reuters)
Updated on Oct 09, 2020 06:15 PM IST

A man walks next to a graffiti depicting a cleaner in protective gear spraying viruses with the face of Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro in Rio de Janeiro on October 7. According to John Hopkins University’s tally, Brazil surpassed 5 million confirmed coronavirus cases on October 7 to become world’s third hardest coronavirus-hit country. (Ricardo Moraes / Reuters)

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People walk around the Saara street market amid the coronavirus outbreak in Rio de Janeiro on October 7. Brazil’s infection figures have fallen to about 27,000 cases and 700 deaths daily from more than 45,000 cases and 1,000 deaths per day from when the country was at the peak of Covid-19 infections, AP reported. (Pilar Olivares / Reuters)
Updated on Oct 09, 2020 06:15 PM IST

People walk around the Saara street market amid the coronavirus outbreak in Rio de Janeiro on October 7. Brazil’s infection figures have fallen to about 27,000 cases and 700 deaths daily from more than 45,000 cases and 1,000 deaths per day from when the country was at the peak of Covid-19 infections, AP reported. (Pilar Olivares / Reuters)

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Jose Aldrinho Guajajara from the Guajajara indigenous ethnic group cured of the coronavirus disease is seen sitting on a hammock at the indigenous village of Bacurizinho in Maranhao state of Brazil on October 5. Despite a decline in cases, experts have warned of a possible second wave of infections that could emerge in early 2021. (Adriano Machado / Reuters)
Updated on Oct 09, 2020 06:15 PM IST

Jose Aldrinho Guajajara from the Guajajara indigenous ethnic group cured of the coronavirus disease is seen sitting on a hammock at the indigenous village of Bacurizinho in Maranhao state of Brazil on October 5. Despite a decline in cases, experts have warned of a possible second wave of infections that could emerge in early 2021. (Adriano Machado / Reuters)

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People sit inside protection booths at the Sushi das Artes restaurant in Rio de Janeiro on October 6. Health officials also say that people shunning isolation and taking to public activities is a pressing concern as campaigning mayors are allowing bars, restaurants and movie theatres to reopen - encouraging people to emerge from quarantine. (Pilar Olivares / Reuters)
Updated on Oct 09, 2020 06:15 PM IST

People sit inside protection booths at the Sushi das Artes restaurant in Rio de Janeiro on October 6. Health officials also say that people shunning isolation and taking to public activities is a pressing concern as campaigning mayors are allowing bars, restaurants and movie theatres to reopen - encouraging people to emerge from quarantine. (Pilar Olivares / Reuters)

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An employee wearing a protective mask and face shield disinfectants the teacher’s lounge at a school in Rio de Janeiro on October 5. “Mayors running for re-election have no interest in imposing any kind of lockdown or restrictions, their incentive is to roll back lockdown measures,” Miguel Lago, Executive director of Brazil’s Institute for Health Policy Studies which advises public health officials told AP. (Andre Coelho / Bloomberg)
Updated on Oct 09, 2020 06:15 PM IST

An employee wearing a protective mask and face shield disinfectants the teacher’s lounge at a school in Rio de Janeiro on October 5. “Mayors running for re-election have no interest in imposing any kind of lockdown or restrictions, their incentive is to roll back lockdown measures,” Miguel Lago, Executive director of Brazil’s Institute for Health Policy Studies which advises public health officials told AP. (Andre Coelho / Bloomberg)

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Eliane Conconi talks to her students in a classroom at Thomaz Rodrigues Alckmin School, on the first day of the return of Sao Paulo state’s schools amid coronavirus outbreak in Sao Paulo on October 7. According to data from Brazil’s statistical institutes - the percentage of people in strict isolation or leaving home only when necessary dropped to 57% in mid-September, from 68% in early July. (Amanda Perobelli / Reuters)
Updated on Oct 09, 2020 06:15 PM IST

Eliane Conconi talks to her students in a classroom at Thomaz Rodrigues Alckmin School, on the first day of the return of Sao Paulo state’s schools amid coronavirus outbreak in Sao Paulo on October 7. According to data from Brazil’s statistical institutes - the percentage of people in strict isolation or leaving home only when necessary dropped to 57% in mid-September, from 68% in early July. (Amanda Perobelli / Reuters)

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A man from the Guajajara indigenous ethnic group stands at a community school in the indigenous village of Morro Branco in Maranhao on October 4. “I wouldn’t recommend governments to relax further; there’s still room for big spikes based on people moving around and not wearing masks,” Michael Touchton, a political science professor at the University of Miami told AP. (Adriano Machado / Reuters)
Updated on Oct 09, 2020 06:15 PM IST

A man from the Guajajara indigenous ethnic group stands at a community school in the indigenous village of Morro Branco in Maranhao on October 4. “I wouldn’t recommend governments to relax further; there’s still room for big spikes based on people moving around and not wearing masks,” Michael Touchton, a political science professor at the University of Miami told AP. (Adriano Machado / Reuters)

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